The Whole You: Lessons Learned After Moving from Nurse to Patient

Best-selling author Hollye Jacobs, RN, MS, MSW, blogs about three lessons she learned after she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Join us for our Annual Fall Conference, part of Wellness Weekend in Denver, CO this September 18-20 to meet Ms. Jacobs, to hear her speak and get a free copy of The Silver Lining Companion Guide in your conference goodie bag at registration for the event. 

As a healthy, happy, vegan-eating, marathon-running, 39-year-old young mother with absolutely no family history of breast cancer, being diagnosed with the disease in 2010 literally shattered my world. As a health care professional, I very quickly moved from the side of the hospital bed into the hospital bed.  This transition from nurse to patient taught me profound life lessons.


Lesson #1: Honor the feelings and let them out.

Prior to my experience with breast cancer, I was a grin-and-bear it kind of girl who was reluctant to share any feeling other than joy. However, once ‘Roid Rage (the intense feelings of anger brought on by pre-chemotherapy steroids) and Chemo-Sobby (tears at the drop of a hat brought on by the chemotherapy flowing through my veins), and the Freight Train of Fatigue (courtesy of the rads of radiation beamed into my body) entered my life, I had no choice but to let all of my feelings out. I was too exhausted to muster the energy to make them look “pretty.” And you know what? Expressing feelings, all feelings, happens to feel good. Really good. Though I no longer have ‘Roid Rage, Chemo-Sobby or the Freight Train of Fatigue (thank goodness!), I continue to openly express my feelings. And it still feels good! No, actually, it feels great! Continue reading

Why I Became The Choosy Chick

In anticipation of our August 12 webinar on environmental health, Health Educator Margot White blogs about why she founded The Choosy Chick.

I have always believed in the benefit of leading a healthy lifestyle, but becoming a mom inspired me to turn it up a notch.  Like most parents, I wanted to provide my children with a healthy foundation and protect them from chemicals that did not belong in their bodies.  After my first son was born I began to realize I was only scratching the surface.  I had a lot to learn about food additives, dyes, artificial flavors and sweeteners, preservatives and chemicals with unpronounceable names.   The more I learned, the more I distrusted the well-known brands that were a major part of our diet.  My kids even picked up on my new habit.  Imagine my embarrassment when my 6 year old blurted out at a birthday party, “Hey Mom, there’s high fructose corn syrup in these fruit snacks!”

By the time my second and third sons came along, I began to learn about the chemicals not just in foods, but in cleaning and personal care products. I became more suspicious about toxins in skincare products when my son became ill during the application of one of those Halloween face painting kits.  His throat started to burn and he vomited white foam.  When I looked at the back of the product label, I noticed the warning to avoid using certain colors near the eyes or mouth.  But wait – this was a FACIAL makeup kit!  How could it possibly create this kind of reaction?mwhiteheadshot2

All along I was experiencing some unexplained rashes, and developed Raynaud’s syndrome.  My doctor started to watch me closely for Lupus, among other autoimmune diseases.  During that same period several close friends and family members were diagnosed with cancer.  I became concerned for the health of my family and myself. I became a mom on a mission committed to reducing our exposure to toxins in foods and household products. I started to investigate the ingredients in diaper creams, lotions, and baby shampoo and again, found good reason to distrust the brands I once thought were safe. I had already discovered that my own makeup and personal care products were loaded with toxic chemicals that are linked to a variety of serious health concerns. Continue reading

Connection, Information and Inspiration: Wellness Weekend

Wellness Weekend brings together two of our most popular programs, our annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experienceswith our signature fundraising eventYoga on the StepsRead this letter from Catherine L. Ormerod, LBBC’s vice president of programs and partnerships, to learn about this event in Denver from September 18 – September 20, 2015.

Photo credit: Rich Grant and VISIT DENVER

Photo credit: Rich Grant and VISIT DENVER

Welcome to Wellness Weekend—three days of connection, information and inspiration from Living Beyond Breast Cancer.

Today, a breast cancer diagnosis requires more than just having the facts. To make the best decisions for your treatment and your life, you want information that helps you understand your options and the possible side effects. Getting good care means knowing where to find help and support, for yourself and for those who love you. And it means caring for yourself as a whole person—understanding how cancer impacts you physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Catherine-Ormerod 1At Wellness Weekend, we connect you with people across the country who share your concerns. Our annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, offers tailored information via three tracks:

  • Triple-negative breast cancer, presented in partnership with Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Hormone receptor-positive or HER2-positive breast cancer
  • Metastatic breast cancer, with information on all subtypes

Select a morning plenary and follow the tracked workshops throughout the day. Or mix and match to make the day your own. You’ll also find workshops specific to young women, those coping with inflammatory breast cancer, and caregivers.

Take advantage of opportunities to connect, including our opening reception Friday evening and optional offsite activities Saturday night.

Denver welcomes its 3rd "Yoga on the Steps" fundraiser at Cheesman park. The event is Living Beyond Breast Cancer's signature fundraiser and engages and connects participants at a large, outdoor yoga class suitable for all ages and skill. A Healthy Living Expo is also a keystone to the day.  "Yoga on the Steps" educates the community about healthy living and quality-of-life-issues regarding breast cancer while creating awareness of and raising funds for LBBCÕs education and support programs, which are always provided for little or no cost. ©2014 Rob Clement | RCVisual

©2014 Rob Clement | RCVisual

Cap off your weekend with Yoga on the Steps: Denver. On Sunday morning, we’ll gather outdoors at Cheesman Park, where the Denver community will join us in an all-levels yoga class and Healthy Living Expo to raise awareness of LBBC—and to celebrate our collective strength.

It will be a weekend of connection, information and inspiration. We hope you can join us.


Cathy's signature

Catherine L. Ormerod, MSS, MLSP

Vice President, Programs and Partnerships
Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Good, Confident and Sexy: Becoming Whole Again

Breast cancer can impact sex, intimacy and body image whether you’re single or in a relationship. In anticipation of our Twitter Chat on Wednesday, June 24, AnaOno Intimates Owner Dana Donofree blogs about her experience regaining confidence and embracing her desirability after treatment.

Dana_Broken Dolls post

I often compare myself to a broken doll. Not the kind that was so beloved, it was carried everywhere, slowly fading and falling into disrepair over time as if it were aging gracefully. More like the kind that was once beautiful, but its owner decided to take construction paper scissors and hack its hair down to oddly shaped tufts, to accidentally (or on purpose) break off a limb or two, scar the midsection with a Sharpie and leave it half bent and mutilated in in the corner of her closet.

Because that’s what breast cancer did to me. It took a perfectly acceptable woman and turned her into a shadow of herself, and when it is all said and done, it made her feel broken, ruined and rejected.

When I was first diagnosed, what was about to happen to my outward appearance wasn’t even on my mind. I thought I had it all together, the strength, the attitude, the “let’s do this.”

See, I was never terribly attached to my breasts. I never even really thought about them all that much. I was 27. My boobs were small, but perky. They hadn’t done anything hero-worthy like nourish a child. Their biggest accomplishment was being able to exist without a bra. Their greatest time to shine was on weekend party nights when they could hang out in a super low-cut blouse and up my va va voom quotient.

So, when the time came to go our very separate ways, my friends threw a “Ta-Ta to Dana’s Ta-Tas” party and they had one last night out on the town in the lowest plunging neckline I could find.

I was pretty flippant and casual about parting with my two of my lady parts. Friends and family took bets on which of my surgeons, Dr. McDreamy and Dr. Hottie, was the better catch. I joked that they would be the last to ever cop a feel of my original breasts.

I thought I was going to be just fine afterward. That it wouldn’t faze me in the least.

But, I never could have prepared myself for what it felt like, both physically and mentally, when I woke from surgery. For something I felt I was completely comfortable with and ready for, losing them, my breasts, shook my world.

I took off the bandages, and saw this alien staring back at me in the mirror. I was mutilated. I was swollen. My scars were their own entity  purple and protruding like someone had chainsawed me up and stapled me back together.

It is not at all what I had imagined. Where was this “We are replacing your boobs with ones just like them so you can feel ‘normal’?” I hadn’t expected to look like a badly-repaired Lego. I expected to kinda come out looking more implanty-boob-job like. This body was the farthest cry from normal I could have ever imagined. Continue reading

Cancer and Sex

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, regularly blogs on ASCO Connection, where this post originally appeared. Learn more about sex and intimacy after a breast cancer diagnosis during our Twitter Chat, Tweets from the Sheets, on Wednesday, June 24.

dizon_don 2012As an oncologist who also runs a sexual health clinic for women treated (or under treatment), I am discovering that my perspective on both issues of cancer treatment (and survival) and life after cancer (and quality of life) is somewhat unique. I am conscious of how difficult it is to bring up cancer therapy and survivorship (let alone sexual health) within the same discussion, yet I have gained a heightened sensitivity of the importance of looking beyond treatment even while we are discussing what to do now. I have benefitted greatly from colleagues in the field of sexual health, such as Michael Krychman, at UC Irvine, and Anne Katz, in Canada, both of whom I have been privileged enough to count as colleagues, co-authors, and contemporaries.

I am even more fortunate that one of my friends here in Boston also shares my interest in women’s health. Sandy Falk is a gynecologist and sees cancer survivors for women’s health issues at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. In our practices, we both see the adverse effects of therapy that patients have to cope with. However, far from the arthralgias of aromatase inhibitors and neuropathy of some of our chemotherapeutic agents (two symptoms which we as oncologists are comfortable discussing), sexual health is often compromised.

There are common complaints encountered by those of us who cover sexual health. They include:

  • “I’m done with treatment, but now I can’t have sex. It is too painful and my sexual desire is completely gone.”
  • “Why didn’t my oncologist warn me about this? Maybe if I had known my partner and I could have worked on this early on. But now, so much time has passed now and my partner and I have lost patience.”
  • “I’m not sure how to go on with my relationship.”

Those may be extreme examples, and I hope for most oncologists that they are. However, what I do know is that these perceptions do exist—inside and outside of medicine. When the paper on AI treatment was picked up by several sites, I had read some comments posted and was disheartened to see that some of the thoughts above were reflected: “A woman should be lucky to be alive,” one stated; another said, “You can’t have sex if you’re dead.”

I believe most oncologists do not discuss sexual health with their patients and as an oncologist, I understand why. Most clinicians reading this might think (perhaps unconsciously) that the patient is “lucky to be alive.” And of course, she is. And we also know that she probably wouldn’t have had the ability to hear detailed information about sexual health during the diagnosis and treatment planning process—there were much bigger priorities then. Continue reading

Reflecting on ASCO 2015

Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s Erin Rowley shares her experience attending this year’s annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, Illinois. Download the audio recording and presentation from our June 4 ASCO webinar to learn about updates from the 2015 meeting.


The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has existed since 1964, and has held an annual conference for almost as long. ASCO created the Journal of Clinical Oncology, a publication in which many important breast cancer studies appear, and cancer breakthroughs are often announced at ASCO’s annual meeting. For years, representatives from Living Beyond Breast Cancer have attended this conference in order to hear about the latest in breast cancer research, and to pass that information on to you, to help you navigate life after a breast cancer diagnosis.

As LBBC’s writer and content coordinator, I went to this year’s conference, which took place May 29 to June 2, in Chicago. It was my first time at the event and it was an exciting opportunity to join the more than 30,000 people from all over the world who were in attendance. Some, like me, were there as patient advocates, representing people with cancer. But the vast majority of people there were cancer doctors. They came to present their own research and to learn from their colleagues.

Over the course of 5 days, thousands of studies, hundreds of which related to breast cancer, were presented; and dozens of educational sessions, in which doctors discussed what recent findings mean for their day-to-day practices, were held.

Moving between sessions about surgery, different breast cancer types, quality of life and other topics required quick navigating of McCormick Place, the largest convention center in North America. I’m certain I walked a few miles as I zigzagged through the crowds! In situations where I couldn’t be in two equally-interesting sounding sessions at once, ASCO’s use of technology and social media were really helpful. Many sessions were filmed, and the Twitter hashtag #ASCO15 helped me see what aspects of the conference people were most excited about. Even though ASCO has been over for about a week, people are STILL using the hashtag to continue the conversation. (Check it out for yourself!) Continue reading