The Spirit of Pageantry

Natalie Gamble is back on our blog with a post about supporting her daughter while in treatment for breast cancer, pageants and being honored with the “Spirit of Pageantry” Award.

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Life doesn’t stop because of a breast cancer diagnosis – it goes on. How you decide to approach that life is up to you. Me personally, I never missed a step.

After deciding on a treatment plan and scheduling my surgery I was on my way to Virginia Beach with my daughter for the International Junior Miss. Some background information about this trip: My daughter Mikayla is my hero and one of the strongest, most driven individuals I know. I tease her all the time that I want to be just like her when I grow up. At the tender age of 9 she announced she wanted to be a microbiologist and will be attending U.C. Berkeley to earn her degree, and here is the kicker – she wants to pay for it herself!  Since those words left her mouth, Mikayla, now 14, has made it her mission to do just that. Besides maintaining a A/B average in school, she competes in natural pageants to earn scholarships, pageants like International Junior Miss.

As a pageant mom, I wear many hats: tailor, beautician, coach, travel agent and cheerleader to name a few. Needless to say, my cancer diagnosis was a huge hiccup in my role as her support system. Monetheless, I was determined to work around it.  On our way back from an exhausting week of competitions, I received a phone call from my daughter’s new pageant director Christina Sacha Grooms, who introduced herself to us and updated us about the rest of my daughter’s reign.  I informed her of my diagnosis and told her that no matter what I would get my daughter where she needed to be.

While I was fighting the good fight in treatment, my daughter was reigning as International Junior Miss’ Colorado Preteen 2014. And as promised she was at every event, photo shoot, and appearance as scheduled. Our pageant family was just as supportive as our immediate family and to this day, I thank God for these incredible people. Every time we saw each other it was a family reunion and it touched my heart to know they read and looked forward to my Facebook posts. Every day I tried to share my feelings and thoughts with my family and friends.  Continue reading

I Wasn’t Broken or Fragile…I Just Had Cancer

20141011_123702Today, LBBC blogger and friend Natalie is here to share what it was like for her to hear the words “You have breast cancer” and how her and her family reacted.

My name is Natalie Gamble, I am 43 years old and in May of 2014 one phone call changed my life forever. ” Your biopsy came back positive, Natalie I’m so sorry but you have cancer.” Cancer? My first reaction of course was tears. I cried in my husband’s arms afraid of the unknown because while an enlarged lymph node was positive for cancer my mammogram and ultrasound had shown nothing but benign cysts. My first thoughts after my crying jag were: “The Devil is a Lie!” Cue my second reaction, I got mad, I mean fighting mad and decided right then and there no matter what I was faced with I was going to fight and I was going to win. The next few days were a blur of appointments, procedures and tests I never even knew existed. After it was all said and done I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Stage II. Continue reading

Growing Initiatives for Metastatic Disease and LGB People Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

Catherine-Ormerod 1Catherine L. Ormerod, MSS, MLSP, LBBC’s Vice President of Programs and Partnerships, blogs about new resources and programs we developed for people living with metastatic breast cancer and LGB people affected by the disease.

This month, LBBC introduces two new initiatives to provide our brand of trusted information and support to two underserved populations in the breast cancer community: people living with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and lesbian, gay and bisexual people diagnosed with breast cancer.

LBBC’s Hear My Voice Outreach Program will train 25 individuals from around the country and who are living with metastatic disease to connect others with resources, information and support for coping with stage IV breast cancer. Original LBBC research, confirmed by subsequent surveys, revealed that those living with MBC feel isolated, misunderstood and often unaware of programs and resources tailored to their experience. Other studies show that participation in peer outreach programs improves emotional health and well-being.

I see the power of connection at every one of LBBC’s conferences and thus I am very excited to begin the Hear My Voice Outreach Program at LBBC’s Annual Conference for Women Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer in April. We have already received many applications for the first Hear My Voice, so we know we have tapped into a large, unmet need.

Our second initiative centers on original content we developed to assist lesbian, gay and bisexual people living with breast cancer get the quality of care they need and deserve. For many, coming out to members of their healthcare team can be difficult or scary. The guide, which is the first of its kind for people with breast cancer, provides information, support and resources to help make having these conversations easier. Continue reading

My Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence (A Poem)

EliseBourneBusbyThe fear of recurrence, or fear of cancer coming back, is one of the most common worries among people affected by breast cancer. Elise Bourne-Busby, EdD, wrote this poem about her own fear of recurrence in anticipation of our free January webinar on this topic.

The fear that cancer may invade my body again
Keeps recurring daily in my brain,
I must change my habits, if I want to stay healthy
Good health is not cheap, I must re-assign my money,
Good nutrition first, eat only the best
Fresh fruits and vegetables, get plenty of rest,
No candy and soda, drink water every day
I am what I eat, and for this I must pay,
My immune system is the core of my being
My body is designed to do the Self–Healing,
I must treat my body kindly, I must help the process
Exercise a little more, eat a little less,
My doctors will treat me, but I must keep the appointment
Get frequent health checks, even though inconvenient,
I must not be scared to ask my doctors any question
They are the experts, I pay for this information,
I must not be afraid to say I don’t understand
I must always, always get a second opinion,
I need my health, so I must remember
To ask my doctors for my health numbers,
Show me my glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure
And when I go home I’ll take my waist measure,
My good health is not only important, it’s mandatory
I must fire my doctors if necessary,
But I am not perfect, I do not always rest
Sometimes I eat junk food, and make my life a mess,
So I have to stay strong, and talk to myself daily
Nurture the core of my being, to balance spirit, mind and body,
I must invest in good health, fear is not an option
I must take care of me, that’s the only solution.

Elise Bourne-Busby, EdD, is a 15-year breast cancer survivor, and is a Reach to Recovery volunteer for the American Cancer Society. She is one of the founding members and chairperson of the group More Than Friends, which gives Sharing and Caring baskets to cancer patients undergoing treatment, provides transportation, makes home and hospital visits and assists the uninsured and under-insured with information to solve medication needs and financial issues.

The fear of recurrence doesn’t have to run your life. Join us on Thursday, January 29, at noon ET, for our fear of reccurence webinar, to learn about practical tools to help you manage your fears.

Celebrating My Five Year Milestone

Surgery Day: Tiffany just before her double mastectomy.

Surgery Day: Tiffany just before her double mastectomy.

LBBC blogger and friend Tiffany Mannino is back, but this time, instead of sharing one of her entries from her self-titled letters ‘Beautifully Broken: Letters From a Girl/Woman/Human in Progress’ penned to her unborn daughter Lola during her breast cancer journey, she’s here to share what being 5 years out from her cancer diagnosis means to her and what she’s learned in the process…

Three weeks ago, I celebrated my five year survivor anniversary. Whether or not the medical world would allow me to call myself ‘cured’, December 16th was an absolutely incredible day and a milestone I will never forget. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but I as reflect on the last five years of my life, I believe that it also takes a village to raise a cancer survivor.  I will never forget when it first hit me that I had my very own village. May 2010…my first Race for the Cure as a survivor. Our Breastfix at Tiffany’s team of more than twenty came together on a very cold, May morning. I was freezing and SO weak from chemo, but I crossed that finish line with tears in my eyes and incredible joy in my heart.  I can’t ever remember a time feeling more loved and supported.

Today: Celebrating where life has taken her.

Today: Celebrating where life has taken her.

I can’t believe that moment was almost five years ago. In some ways it seems like yesterday and in other ways it seems like a lifetime ago.  Of course, me being me, I have taken a lot of time to reflect on what I’ve learned and how I have grown from this experience.  In some ways, my post cancer journey has been more difficult than being in ‘battle mode’.  Having cancer changed the course of my life and although I was unbelievably thankful that God healed me, I also had to ask, “Ok. I’m alive. Now what?” I was in my late thirties, divorced, unable to bear children, and completely lost.  Several years later, I’m still trying to figure it all out, but the greatest thing I have learned is that I am so blessed because although I may not know where my life is headed, I have a village. I have family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, students, parents, doctors, yogis, trainers, fellow survivor sisters, bloggers, and even former boyfriends who love and support me no matter what.

Continue reading

‘Tis the Season for Giving

10478588_10204051655830539_1428283575535628673_nIn her role as Vice President of Advancement at Living Beyond Breast Cancer, Sandy Martin works directly with the community of individual donors and corporate partners whose financial support allows us to further our mission of connecting people to trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.

One of the things that I often admire most about the work we do at LBBC is the level of commitment to our mission that is shared by our constituency.  Recently, I was able to reflect again about how deep that commitment runs.

Over the last few weeks, as we have been preparing stories for our upcoming quarterly newsletter, Insight, this admiration struck me again.  That’s because an article in our Spring 2015 edition will feature personal reflections by some of our supporters about what LBBC means to them as well as why they feel it is important to give back to our organization.  One of these stories comes from Terry Frangiosa of Harleysville, Pennsylvania.  Terry, while not diagnosed with breast cancer herself, has been a long-time LBBC supporter who says “I attended my first LBBC conference with my sister, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 33.  We were both shocked and frightened by the diagnosis, especially because she was so young.   We left feeling empowered by the information we learned at that conference. As our knowledge grew our fear decreased and the conference became a part of my sister’s healing process.  Donating to LBBC’s Guardian Angel program, a service that offsets conference registration fees for those experiencing economic hardship, is my way to help others access the information and support they need and to make a difference in their lives. I know attending that conference years ago did exactly that for my sister and family.” Continue reading

What to Get for Women Who Have Cancer: A Gift Giving Guide

Jenny Burkholder 2013With the holidays quickly approaching, LBBC Breast Cancer Helpline volunteer, Jenny Burkholder, shares her tips on gift giving for someone you love who has breast cancer. 

Last week, a colleague approached me to talk about her sister-in-law, who is about to have a lumpectomy and radiation. I assumed she wanted to talk about cancer. I was more than happy to lend my insights, but what I realized was that what she was asking me was: what can I get for a woman who has cancer? I asked her to clarify, and what she was actually asking me was: what can I buy for her so she can feel better about this whole ugly situation? And maybe she was also saying was: what can I buy for her, so I can feel better about this whole ugly situation? Either way, I’m all for gift giving; everyone benefits.

I have to admit, one of the unexpected by-products of having cancer was that I received a number of thoughtful and inspired gifts. When I say gifts, what I mean is I received many tangible items, from writing journals to pillow cases, to already read and loved books, to comfortable pajamas and organic skincare products. I also received many intangible things, like support and love, guidance and friendship. I was more than happy to receive these things because they did make me feel better, and now when I meet a woman who has been diagnosed, I send her a gift. I have given headscarves and writing journals, big hoop earrings and organic skincare products. I have also given phone calls and hugs.

So in thinking about my gift giving, I have devised a list of both tangible and intangible gifts that one can give and ask for this season and beyond. Continue reading

Giving Tuesday 2014

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We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for shopping. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back! Giving Tuesday is a day for charities, families, businesses, community centers and students around the world to come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give back. LBBC is excited to announce that we will be a part of Giving Tuesday 2014 on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 and as a participating charity, we’re asking that you help us by spreading the word about Living Beyond Breast Cancer by being a part of our #LBBCUnselfie campaign.

 

Simply share a picture of yourself on your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram account holding a sign that reads “I am #LBBCUnselfie” and caption the image with why or how you support Living Beyond Breast Cancer. Your support can be anything from why you participate in LBBC’s programs and services to why you donate or volunteer at events, or it can be in honor of someone you know who has breast cancer and uses LBBC’s services. It’s completely up to you! Just make sure you use #LBBCUnselfie in your caption so we can re-tweet, re-gram and add your Facebook photo to the #LBBCUnselfie photo album on our Facebook page. We can’t wait to see the #LBBCUnSelfie images on Giving Tuesday – but posting your photos today so you can be featured first on Giving Tuesday!

 
Here are some example of #LBBCUnSelfie posts:

 

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Help us spread the word and hopefully everyone can learn about Living Beyond Breast Cancer and share why they too are #LBBCUnselfie!

Who Was This Woman Looking At Me? Was She Even A Woman?

Tough Girl 2!Tiffany Mannino is back to share yet another of her diary entries penned to her unborn daughter Lola during her breast cancer journey. She has entitled the letters Beautifully Broken: Letters From a Girl/Woman/Human in Progress’ as she reflects on her five year journey with letting go of the past, facing fears, learning to love, finding happiness in the moment, and realizing that she is exactly where she is supposed to be in life.

Oh baby…I am so tired the computer screen is looking fuzzy, however, a few moments ago, I had this compulsion to write to you rather than crawl into bed. After nine months of being on sabbatical, I have finally gone back to work to start a new school year. I wish I could tell you the transition was easy, but the last few weeks have been grueling. I have been an emotional wreck having meltdowns on a daily basis. The best way that I can describe my state is that I feel like a beached horseshoe crab that has been flipped on its back and can’t seem to turn over. It squirms with the scorching sun beating down on its parched shell. The strangest part of this all is that as difficult as this change is for me, deep in my heart I know that I am going to come out of this a better soul. Like a molting horseshoe crab, I feel like I am shedding my old self and beginning a new. Continue reading

LBBC and Angela & Roi

A&RLogo2 Angela-Roi-handbag-2_mediumAs most of you know, we at LBBC have an initiative called “Beyond October”. We do this because over 300,000 individuals will be diagnosed with breast cancer each year and roughly 1 in 12 of these individuals are diagnosed during the month of October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Given this, the majority of individuals are diagnosed during the rest of the year, hence our “Beyond October” campaign. We have various partners who embrace this idea but today, classic vegan handbags for a cause makers Angela & Roi, are sharing why they’ve decided to partner with LBBC and why they believe in Beyond October…

Throughout our daily life, we often ask the question – is it possible to do what we love, and better the world while doing it?  At Angela & Roi, we believe this is not only possible but also the way that companies should be conducted.  We are founded on the belief that businesses should accept social responsibility for the products they put out, and utilize their resources to positively impact the greater community around them. We believe in using our passions for good. Continue reading