Mets Monday: Reflecting on Those Who Joined us for the Annual Mets Conference

This past weekend we held our 9th Annual Conference for Women Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. More than 300 people from 42 states came and gathered information, connected for support—and voiced their concern that few in the general public understand the scope and gravity of living with stage IV breast cancer. We’ll be posting lots more about the conference in the coming days, but here’s a quick look at some of our participants during the event.

LBBC’s Hear My Voice volunteers organized a group to depict the need for greater awareness of what metastatic breast cancer really means and to gain insight and support from those around them.


For others, the conference provided an opportunity to gain support from meetings others facing a similar diagnosis.

This #MetsMonday, we acknowledge the loss of 108* people every day to metastatic breast cancer. We will continue to highlight the needs and experiences of people living with this diagnosis, especially as we develop a public education and outreach campaign that will launch this fall. Together, we can make all the difference in our own unique way.
If you are inspired to share your thoughts on living with metastatic disease please add your voice here or to our Facebook page or Twitter feed.
*The 108 figure comes from the 2013 American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Facts and Figures. The number of estimated deaths from metastatic breast cancer in 2013 was 39,620. Divide that by 365, and you get 108. The number of estimated deaths increased to 40,000 in 2014.

Hear My Voice: ‘You Beat it by How You Live’

Norma Pitzer KellyOn Super Bowl Sunday, The NFL Countdown crew aired a tribute to late ESPN anchor Stuart Scott, who passed away last month from cancer of the appendix. Hear My Voice blogger Norma Pitzer-Kelly writes about the sports anchor’s decision to share his cancer experience with the public, and how his words can guide those living with stage IV breast cancer.

Stuart Scott died on January 4th, 2015. If you aren’t into sports or have friends and family who watch Sports Center on ESPN, you may have no idea who he is. Stuart was a sportscaster and host on that show. He was a pioneer in sports broadcasting and was well loved by professional athletes, celebrities, co-workers and friends.  He was also a cancer patient.

Stuart fought this disease for 7 years. It started in 2007 with an emergency appendectomy which turned out to be cancer of the appendix. Did you even think cancer of the appendix was a thing? I didn’t. Cancer is an insidious monster and it will attack you anywhere – I know that, and yet I didn’t think about the appendix as being susceptible. I was introduced to Stuart while watching Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts interviewed him last spring.  During that interview, he told the story of his diagnosis, talked about his daughters and his refusal to give up hope.

Stuart was a devoted and loving father, he was an icon in the sports community, and his style and catch phrases will live on, but he, unfortunately, will not. After fighting like a champion with strength, grace and a quiet dignity the monster took his life, and those daughters he was so devoted to will have to live the rest of their lives without him.

I didn’t know Stuart personally, of course. I can’t even say I watched his show on ESPN – I didn’t.  But after following his journey with cancer, I feel sadness at his loss, as if he had been a friend. Having cancer gives you membership into a club you never wanted to join and camaraderie with other “members” that make you feel like old friends even if you’ve never met. As a metastatic breast cancer patient, I have felt this connection to others first hand many times over. Continue reading

Hear My Voice: From Cancer Mess to Organizational Success…

Katherine O'BrienKatherine O’Brien didn’t let being messy get in the way of organizing for metastatic breast cancer advocacy, awareness and support.

I have been living with a small volume of bone mets since 2009. In some respects, I think my metastatic breast cancer shares some of my character flaws. We know that cancer represents cellular chaos—all cancers start because abnormal cells grew out of control.

I can’t say that I am out of control, exactly, but I will confess to being a messy person. Organizational skills have never been my strong suit. I have purchased many filing systems, sorters, tote boxes, but inevitably I always default to my H&P ways: Heaps & Piles. Heaps of things represent unstable stacks—assorted mail pieces, notebooks, brochures, various business cards that spring up on my desk like toadstools after days of rain. Piles have fewer shape variations and more structural stability: I have piles of books on my coffee table, piles of CDs on an end table and, of course, piles of laundry.

If I were a neater person, I would probably be a far more efficient person. But at 48 years old, I am just happy to muddle along. I am glad my cancer—so far—seems to have this same attitude. It is too disorganized and lackadaisical to do too much. Let’s face it: I am the Oscar Madison of the metastatic world, too.

I thought of all of these things yesterday when I heard Joan Lunden actually say the words “metastatic breast cancer” on television as part of a story to kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In prior years, such coverage focused almost exclusively on early-stage breast cancer. They never acknowledged either the 150,000 U.S, people living with metastatic breast cancer or the 40,000 U.S. people who die from it annually. Continue reading

Listening to the Voices of Those With Metastatic Breast Cancer

Catherine-Ormerod 1This week, articles published in the New York Times and The Guardian criticized blogger Lisa Boncheck Adams’ decisions to publicly write and tweet about her experiences with metastatic breast cancer.  Catherine Ormerod, Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s vice president, programs and partnerships, weighs in on this issue. 

This past Sunday former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller wrote an op-ed posing questions about Lisa Boncheck Adams’ public blog about her experiences with metastatic breast cancer. In particular, he questioned the choices she has made as a young wife and mother to extend her life as long as possible through, what Keller termed, “heroic measures”: taking treatments until they stop working and moving on to the next treatment. The treatment that Adams’ has pursued is, in fact, the standard way of treating metastatic disease. Continue reading

Introducing My+Story

Kevin Gianotto is the associate director of marketing, public relations and corporate partnerships at Living Beyond Breast Cancer.  He’s worked for nonprofit organizations since 2002.

Two weeks ago, I attended a reception at the Dover International Speedway where I had the chance to introduce a number of individuals I met to the work we do at LBBC to connect people to trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.  The conversations I had that evening inevitably led to the opportunity for me to discuss what I am most passionate about here at LBBC –women who have been diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, many of whom have become close friends, and the educational resources and support services LBBC has available for them.

52792_10151113120997285_1062790530_oMetastatic breast cancer—a form of advanced breast cancer also referred to as stage IV breast cancer—occurs when breast cancer has spread to other parts of the body.  Approximately 159,000 women in the United States are currently living with metastatic breast cancer, and this number is projected to increase to approximately 164,000 by the year 2015.

To raise awareness of Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day on October 13, LBBC has partnered with the MedImmune Specialty Care Division of AstraZeneca to promote the launch of My+Story, an online resource center which highlights the needs of women living with metastatic breast cancer and calls attention to metastatic disease as a key component of October’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day was officially recognized by the U.S. Congress in 2009, following a grassroots awareness effort led by members of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN).

The My+Story site houses tools and information tailored for women living with advanced disease. The website is designed to connect patients with the information they need, and links to patient support groups that have specific programs for metastatic breast cancer patients—like LBBC and MBCN.

Visitors can learn about metastatic breast cancer and treatment options, find tips on how to take care of their bodies, and celebrate their life experiences by creating a hard copy photobook of personal stories that may be shared with loved ones. Women with metastatic breast cancer and those who are directly inspired by them can also create a personalized flower badge that can be shared at and with their personal social media community to help raise awareness. In addition, supporters of women with metastatic breast cancer can visit to download free educational materials and inspire members of their community to help raise awareness of the disease.

Other great interactive features (ones my social media team here at LBBC love) allow visitors to share their favorite images and information from the site with others via Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. And, throughout the month, AstraZeneca will make a contribution to LBBC and MBCN each time visitors share content (up to a total of $28,000) in acknowledgment of the 28 years since National Breast Cancer Awareness Month was established and of the ongoing effort to bring metastatic breast cancer to the forefront. If you’re inclined, be sure to check out the site and let us know what you think.

Our New Vision and Mission


This morning, Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s CEO Jean Sachs released the following message to our friends and supporters:

Dear Friends:

All of us at Living Beyond Breast Cancer are excited to share our new vision and mission statements with you:

Our new vision

A world where no one impacted by breast cancer feels uninformed or alone.

Our new mission

To connect people with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.

These new statements were developed with the help of over 1,200 of you who responded to a survey we sent out earlier this year. Your input was used in a day-long retreat with members of the board of directors and staff. We learned what LBBC services are valued most and why so many have come to depend on our educational programs and services that allow for connection to others diagnosed with breast cancer.

For me, these new statements say with clarity what we strive to do every day and what we hope to achieve over time. Yesterday, I spoke with a long-time friend who had just been diagnosed with breast cancer.  She was overwhelmed, scared and shocked. Our conversation and the resources I was able to put in her hands grounded her and provided her with enough comfort and confidence to take the next step.

This is what LBBC does every day, and it is exactly what the new vision and mission statements express.

I hope you share my enthusiasm and, as always, if you have comments I would love to hear from you.



Jean A. Sachs, MSS, MLSP

Chief Executive Officer


LBBC’s Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Focus Groups Need Participants!

TN Focus Group Header

Do you have triple-negative breast cancer, or know someone who does? LBBC is planning several focus groups to learn about the needs of women living with triple-negative breast cancer. Groups are planned in the areas of Chapel Hill, N.C., on April 10; Philadelphia, Pa., on April 12 and April 13, (focusing on metastatic breast cancer); and San Francisco, Calif., and Indianapolis, Ind., the last week of April (dates TBD). Groups last 90 minutes, and participants receive a $25 gift card for their time. If you are interested in participating in a focus group, please contact us ASAP at and let us know which location interests you. We will be in touch with more information!