Mets Monday: Reflecting on Those Who Joined us for the Annual Mets Conference

This past weekend we held our 9th Annual Conference for Women Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. More than 300 people from 42 states came and gathered information, connected for support—and voiced their concern that few in the general public understand the scope and gravity of living with stage IV breast cancer. We’ll be posting lots more about the conference in the coming days, but here’s a quick look at some of our participants during the event.

LBBC’s Hear My Voice volunteers organized a group to depict the need for greater awareness of what metastatic breast cancer really means and to gain insight and support from those around them.

108everyday_1

For others, the conference provided an opportunity to gain support from meetings others facing a similar diagnosis.

This #MetsMonday, we acknowledge the loss of 108* people every day to metastatic breast cancer. We will continue to highlight the needs and experiences of people living with this diagnosis, especially as we develop a public education and outreach campaign that will launch this fall. Together, we can make all the difference in our own unique way.
If you are inspired to share your thoughts on living with metastatic disease please add your voice here or to our Facebook page or Twitter feed.
*The 108 figure comes from the 2013 American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Facts and Figures. The number of estimated deaths from metastatic breast cancer in 2013 was 39,620. Divide that by 365, and you get 108. The number of estimated deaths increased to 40,000 in 2014.

Hear My Voice: From Cancer Mess to Organizational Success…

Katherine O'BrienKatherine O’Brien didn’t let being messy get in the way of organizing for metastatic breast cancer advocacy, awareness and support.

I have been living with a small volume of bone mets since 2009. In some respects, I think my metastatic breast cancer shares some of my character flaws. We know that cancer represents cellular chaos—all cancers start because abnormal cells grew out of control.

I can’t say that I am out of control, exactly, but I will confess to being a messy person. Organizational skills have never been my strong suit. I have purchased many filing systems, sorters, tote boxes, but inevitably I always default to my H&P ways: Heaps & Piles. Heaps of things represent unstable stacks—assorted mail pieces, notebooks, brochures, various business cards that spring up on my desk like toadstools after days of rain. Piles have fewer shape variations and more structural stability: I have piles of books on my coffee table, piles of CDs on an end table and, of course, piles of laundry.

If I were a neater person, I would probably be a far more efficient person. But at 48 years old, I am just happy to muddle along. I am glad my cancer—so far—seems to have this same attitude. It is too disorganized and lackadaisical to do too much. Let’s face it: I am the Oscar Madison of the metastatic world, too.

I thought of all of these things yesterday when I heard Joan Lunden actually say the words “metastatic breast cancer” on television as part of a story to kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In prior years, such coverage focused almost exclusively on early-stage breast cancer. They never acknowledged either the 150,000 U.S, people living with metastatic breast cancer or the 40,000 U.S. people who die from it annually. Continue reading

From Silent to Vocal, Invisible to Visible, Underserved to Served

2012JeanSachsHeadshotVer2WebWhy LBBC Programs Focus on Metastatic Breast Cancer in October

By Jean Sachs, MSS, MLSP
CEO, LBBC

For nearly two decades I have dedicated my professional life to educating and supporting women, men and families whose lives have been impacted by breast cancer.  Over these years I have met so many incredible people who have faced this disease with courage and grace.  Every time I meet someone living with metastatic breast cancer, her story has a profound impact on me. LBBC is and has been committed to being there for these women and men.

In 2006, LBBC learned through its groundbreaking survey of women with metastatic breast cancer what I had heard so many times from my conversations with women living with the disease.  They often felt alone, poorly understood and served. The survey’s title, Silent Voices: Women with Advanced (Metastatic) Breast Cancer Share Their Needs and Preferences for Information, Support and Practical Resources, reflected this.

Before our study, women with MBC had never been asked about their needs as they faced the reality of a diagnosis that means they will always be in treatment. The survey also told us how isolated and alone women with MBC feel within the larger breast cancer community, especially during October when the focus of Breast Cancer Awareness Month skews heavily toward those newly diagnosed or whose treatment has ended—those who appear, at least on the surface, to be doing well.

LBBC took the information shared by our MBC survey respondents and began developing programs specifically for women with MBC to educate, connect and support them. Our Annual Conference for Women Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was founded in 2007, and specialized guides, webinars and peer support soon followed. We began to focus our October educational programs toward MBC.

Thirteen personal stories will be posted over 13 hours, written by women and men living with metastatic disease, their caregivers and healthcare professionals. The posts will appear on a special webpage on lbbc.org as well as on our organizational blog, livingbeyondbc.wordpress.com. Going forward, the LBBC Blog will feature at least one MBC focused post a month under the Hear My Voice banner.

It is my hope that this October the national conversation will start shifting to include more messages about MBC and many more voices discussing it year round. National organizations, including LBBC, have already formed the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (MBCA), a group of patient advocacy organizations and industry partners seeking to improve the lives of and outcomes for those with metastatic breast cancer and their families. MBCA seeks to increase awareness and education about the disease, advance policy and strategic coordination of research funding. This group will release a landscape analysis of MBC research and services on October 13.  Together we have a louder voice and more strength to respond to the needs of those living with metastatic breast cancer.

All of this brings me back to my intertwined personal and professional commitment to LBBC- creating a world where no one impacted by breast cancer feels uninformed or alone. Our work continues.