Why I Became The Choosy Chick

In anticipation of our August 12 webinar on environmental health, Health Educator Margot White blogs about why she founded The Choosy Chick.

I have always believed in the benefit of leading a healthy lifestyle, but becoming a mom inspired me to turn it up a notch.  Like most parents, I wanted to provide my children with a healthy foundation and protect them from chemicals that did not belong in their bodies.  After my first son was born I began to realize I was only scratching the surface.  I had a lot to learn about food additives, dyes, artificial flavors and sweeteners, preservatives and chemicals with unpronounceable names.   The more I learned, the more I distrusted the well-known brands that were a major part of our diet.  My kids even picked up on my new habit.  Imagine my embarrassment when my 6 year old blurted out at a birthday party, “Hey Mom, there’s high fructose corn syrup in these fruit snacks!”

By the time my second and third sons came along, I began to learn about the chemicals not just in foods, but in cleaning and personal care products. I became more suspicious about toxins in skincare products when my son became ill during the application of one of those Halloween face painting kits.  His throat started to burn and he vomited white foam.  When I looked at the back of the product label, I noticed the warning to avoid using certain colors near the eyes or mouth.  But wait – this was a FACIAL makeup kit!  How could it possibly create this kind of reaction?mwhiteheadshot2

All along I was experiencing some unexplained rashes, and developed Raynaud’s syndrome.  My doctor started to watch me closely for Lupus, among other autoimmune diseases.  During that same period several close friends and family members were diagnosed with cancer.  I became concerned for the health of my family and myself. I became a mom on a mission committed to reducing our exposure to toxins in foods and household products. I started to investigate the ingredients in diaper creams, lotions, and baby shampoo and again, found good reason to distrust the brands I once thought were safe. I had already discovered that my own makeup and personal care products were loaded with toxic chemicals that are linked to a variety of serious health concerns. Continue reading

TNBC Aware: Moving Forward After a Triple-Negative Metastatic Diagnosis

Cheryl Solomen writes about understanding her diagnosis, maintaining her routine and doing the activities she enjoys while living with triple-negative metastatic breast cancer.


I was diagnosed with triple-negative metastatic breast cancer in October 2012.

I was visiting with my daughter in Florida with my fiancé in September. While showering, I felt a mass in my left breast – it was hard and I was terrified.

When I got back home I called my primary care doctor and went to see her. During the appointment, she said she didn’t think it was anything to worry about. With that I was supposed to be appeased, but I wasn’t – I knew something was wrong. I insisted that I wanted a script for a mammogram and ultrasound. I went for these tests the same day and the radiology technician said preliminarily that the lump looked abnormal – the technician suggested I see a specialist.  I went back to the doctors very upset. I saw another doctor and he referred me to a breast specialist whom I saw the next day.

The specialist was wonderful and comforting and insisted it was early and “we caught it.”  “How do you know that?” I asked.  I wanted to make sure.   I semi-digested the news and was ready to begin my treatment plan. Then I learned that my PET scan showed the breast cancer had metastasized to my lymph glands and liver.  I didn’t even know what that word metastasized meant or what any of this meant. Tests also revealed that I was diagnosed with triple-negative disease. Another term I had never heard. That was scary. Continue reading

My Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence (A Poem)

EliseBourneBusbyThe fear of recurrence, or fear of cancer coming back, is one of the most common worries among people affected by breast cancer. Elise Bourne-Busby, EdD, wrote this poem about her own fear of recurrence in anticipation of our free January webinar on this topic.

The fear that cancer may invade my body again
Keeps recurring daily in my brain,
I must change my habits, if I want to stay healthy
Good health is not cheap, I must re-assign my money,
Good nutrition first, eat only the best
Fresh fruits and vegetables, get plenty of rest,
No candy and soda, drink water every day
I am what I eat, and for this I must pay,
My immune system is the core of my being
My body is designed to do the Self–Healing,
I must treat my body kindly, I must help the process
Exercise a little more, eat a little less,
My doctors will treat me, but I must keep the appointment
Get frequent health checks, even though inconvenient,
I must not be scared to ask my doctors any question
They are the experts, I pay for this information,
I must not be afraid to say I don’t understand
I must always, always get a second opinion,
I need my health, so I must remember
To ask my doctors for my health numbers,
Show me my glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure
And when I go home I’ll take my waist measure,
My good health is not only important, it’s mandatory
I must fire my doctors if necessary,
But I am not perfect, I do not always rest
Sometimes I eat junk food, and make my life a mess,
So I have to stay strong, and talk to myself daily
Nurture the core of my being, to balance spirit, mind and body,
I must invest in good health, fear is not an option
I must take care of me, that’s the only solution.

Elise Bourne-Busby, EdD, is a 15-year breast cancer survivor, and is a Reach to Recovery volunteer for the American Cancer Society. She is one of the founding members and chairperson of the group More Than Friends, which gives Sharing and Caring baskets to cancer patients undergoing treatment, provides transportation, makes home and hospital visits and assists the uninsured and under-insured with information to solve medication needs and financial issues.

The fear of recurrence doesn’t have to run your life. Join us on Thursday, January 29, at noon ET, for our fear of reccurence webinar, to learn about practical tools to help you manage your fears.

Healthy Recipes to Include in Your Holiday Tradition

With Thanksgiving in three days, the holiday season is officially in full swing. In anticipation of our December 3 Twitter chat, #LBBCchat: Healthy Eating After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Kendall Scott, co-founder and health coach of The Kicking Kitchenis back on our blog to share three recipes to add to your holiday feast.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Savory Stuffed Acorn Squash

I love making stuffed squash: It fills my kitchen with sweet and savory scents and fills me up without feeling bloated and tired afterward. My mother-in-law also makes her own delicious version of stuffed squash. She gave me the idea to make them up ahead of time, wrapping each half of a stuffed squash in aluminum foil, baking some immediately to enjoy now and storing the rest in the fridge for up to three days. Then you just pop them in the oven and they’re ready to eat in an hour!

Yield: makes 4 stuffed squash halves


1/2 cup brown rice

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/4 red onion, finely chopped

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 small zucchini, small chop

2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped

5 crimini mushrooms, finely chopped

2 cups baby spinach, loosely packed

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1/4 cup nutritional yeast

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Dash of  pepper Continue reading

Hear My Voice: Living the Life of Clichés (That Are True)

LBBC Blog - Scott Cotlar%27s PhotoScott Cotlar writes about living by common clichés for people affected by metastatic breast cancer.

When I was first diagnosed with metastatic male breast cancer, I was not prepared to make any major changes in my life. There were just a few small lesions in my lungs. I was fully functional, working full-time as an attorney and had no interest in changing my daily routine.

That was about 6 years ago. Fast forward to today – lesions in my lung are “too numerous to count” according to the radiologist’s report; 5 bouts of gamma knife radiation of the brain for a total of 13 lesions treated; radiation to most of my spine; and now large metastatic lesions in my liver. Even with all of this, my good quality of life did not change until…a lesion on my tibia (a bone between the knee and the ankle) gave me an “elevated risk for fracture,” requiring that I wear a leg brace and walk with a cane.

The lesion to my tibia was the game changer. All of a sudden, my quality of life was deeply affected: the simple act of walking was no longer quite so simple. I felt an urgent need to “get my affairs in order.” As I write this blog I am preparing for chemotherapy, which I have done my best to avoid for the past 6 years, taking advantage of any hormonal or targeted therapy that I could get my hands on. I am finally starting to feel like a “real cancer patient.” Continue reading

Hear My Voice: The Hope of Many Summers After a Metastatic Triple-Negative Diagnosis

Annie GoodmanNew York journalist Annie Goodman discusses the realities of a metastatic triple-negative breast cancer diagnosis, and living her life with more hope and less fear.


Maybe it’s all in my head. I can’t have brain tumors. Maybe I’m just depressed and need psychiatric help.

After discovering a lump, I was diagnosed with stage IIB triple-negative breast cancer on February 29, 2012. I was 30 years old with no family history of cancer. I had a mastectomy, reconstruction, four rounds of Adriamycin and Cytoxan and 12 rounds of Abraxane chemotherapy. While in treatment, I found out I had the BRCA1 mutation. On November 30, 2012, I finished radiation and my doctor declared I was in remission.

I went back to normal life. I enjoyed having a healthy appetite again. My hair grew back. I went back to work full-time. Having cancer was no longer all I could think about. It started to become a memory, and I loved life as a survivor.

Due to the BRCA1 mutation, I had to go for ultrasounds of my ovaries every six months. My first screening was perfect. In November 2013, I went for my second ultrasound, and as soon as I got into work, my doctor’s office called: I needed to come in immediately. My right ovary was 11 cm. A normal ovary is 3 cm.  Continue reading

Hear My Voice: Facing the Emotional Roller Coaster of Metastatic Breast Cancer

MBC PyschoSocial Expert Julie Larson LCSWA diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer can lead to a roller coaster of emotions, which is normal. Julie Larson, LCSW, developed this list of tips and ideas to help smooth the ride. 

The weight in the room is palpable, thick with uncertainty and fear. Later I hear undeniable hope and the unmistakable clear tone of renewed perspective. Tears swell close to the surface during intimate conversations and the roar of laughter is a quick partner to humility and grace. This is the roller coaster of emotions that inevitably accompanies a cancer diagnosis, including metastatic breast cancer. Fear, worry and uncertainty woven together with hope, renewed perspective and gratitude. Experiencing the extreme shifts is often startling and unfamiliar to many affected by metastatic disease. Yet, most of those living with metastatic breast cancer (and their loved ones) have been affected by the ride.

Often it is helpful to know these emotional ups and downs are normal. You are not alone. After all, a metastatic breast cancer diagnosis is a life-changing experience. Treatment alone often demands changes in your daily routine, shifts in professional goals and physical losses which can be challenging to reconcile. “Why me” questions and the uncertainty about the future can be overwhelming.

Finding your way through the day to day is an exercise in self-awareness, acceptance, and frustration tolerance. And yet, those with metastatic disease all over the world are not only surviving but thriving as they live with cancer. The tips and ideas below may help smooth the ride a bit for you. Continue reading