Changing The Way I Viewed Stage IV: How I Learned I’m Not Alone

Sheila Johnson-Glover is back on the LBBC blog to talk about the Annual Conference for Women Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer, how it changed the way she saw her diagnosis and connected her with a community of support. Learn about our Ninth Annual Conference for Women Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer, taking place April 11-12, 2015 in Philadelphia.

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Motivating, exciting, empowering, community building, love, strength, laughter and unity – these are the words that describe how I felt during and after I attended my first Annual Conference for Women Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer. For me, this conference was a game changer on how I viewed my diagnosis. The event gave me a new hope and a new beginning. I determined then that I would fight and continue to fight and to encourage other’s to attend this conference so they too can make lifelong friendships and get all the updates on research, treatment and support for people living with a stage IV breast cancer diagnosis.

I was diagnosed with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in December 2009. I had to ask my doctor, “Well how many stages are there?” My doctor responded, “Sheila you have the worst one.” As you can imagine, my heart felt like it had exploded and my whole body went numb. I needed to know more about metastatic breast cancer and meet women like myself who were living with this diagnosis, and learn if they felt the same way I did emotionally and physically. I was a total wreck when I learned I had stage IV breast cancer. I knew nothing about stage IV and I didn’t have anyone I could relate to.

Living Beyond Breast Cancer has been a true blessing in my life. I was introduced to LBBC by my support group, the Young Women’s Breast Cancer Program in St Louis, Missouri, and what a joy it’s been! I soon learned about the amazing conferences LBBC hosted, and I thought attending one would be a great opportunity to meet those who understood the same battle that I faced every day. I wanted to ask other people living with stage IV breast cancer questions like how they deal with side effects and what questions I should ask my oncologist. I would later learn that every cancer treatment plan is different but still, I needed to hear from others who understood what I was going through.  Continue reading

TNBC Aware: How Being Diagnosed With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Connected Me To My Roots

Speaker and Integrative Cancer Care and Wellness Coach Eileen Fuentes on how triple-negative breast cancer connected her to her cultural roots. Eileen also included a recipe below!

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Wellness and healthy living has become very trendy. It seems as if everyone is sipping on smoothies and doing yoga. While I have always been health-conscious, the messages I was receiving in the media confused me about what to eat and how to live. Like many women, I thought low-fat anything, artificial sweeteners, and highly processed foods were good for me.

It wasn’t until I was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) at 34 years old that I made it a point to really understand how to eat and live in order to reduce my risk of recurrence. What makes TNBC unique is that there are no targeted therapies to treat it and it has a poorer prognosis as compared to other breast cancer subtypes. While I’d agree with you that this cancer is definitely “negative”, the name actually refers to the fact that the cancer is estrogen receptor negative (ER-), progesterone receptor negative (ER-), and HER2/neu negative. This disease also disproportionally affects premenopausal women and those of African-American and Latino heritage.

The fact that I fit into both categories and had no family history motivated me to look closer at what I could do given my limited medical options. Below are 5 lifestyle changes that I made that were beneficial:

  1. No matter how I felt, I always exercised regularly including simple movements like walking or more vigorous activities like qigong.
  2. I began my spiritual journey to learn more about myself, my purpose, and to seek guidance on my post-cancer life.
  3. I maintained a journal, which later turned into a newsletter for my loved ones, and ultimately a blog.
  4. I stopped using toxic products on my body and reduced the toxic thoughts I allowed to entire my mind.
  5. I used to food to reduce the side-effects of cancer treatment and to connect me to family/caregivers.

Continue reading

Hear My Voice: Dealing With the ‘What Ifs’ Before and After ‘I Do’

LBBC blog pic_AyannaAyanna Kalasunas writes about how she and her husband overcame the what-ifs and lived their lives together after her diagnosis with metastatic breast cancer.

“To join with you and to share with you, all that is to come…”

While going over our wedding vows, this was the part that was hardest for me. What a loaded statement given our circumstances. There were moments while I was planning our wedding that I was consumed with joy knowing that I had found my soul mate. I never thought I would love so deeply, trust so willingly and laugh so hard. There were also extremely difficult moments when I just about drove myself insane. What if the pain of my most current metastasis to my bones prevented me from walking gracefully down the aisle as I had dreamed? (I had acquired quite a limp at the start of the summer because of the disease in my hip.) And the one that kept me sleepless in bed a few nights after slaving over DIY projects and the perfect shade of pink…What if I get sick and we have to cancel the wedding?

Trying to balance my diagnosis and my thoughts on forever didn’t just start with our wedding. I was diagnosed just one month after our engagement. While most women are basking in the glow of their recent engagement and diving head first into the sea of planning, I was forced to put all thoughts of a wedding on the back burner and focus on my health. It felt like all the things we planned to do might never come to be. The what-ifs that come with a metastatic breast cancer diagnosis can rival the worst day in treatment sometimes. Continue reading

Hear My Voice: Remembering Us in October

SheilaJohnsonGloverSheila Johnson-Glover blogs about the importance of discussing breast cancer in the African-American community and recognizing people who are living with metastatic breast cancer.

When people hear I have stage IV breast cancer, I wonder if they automatically think I’m going to die. No one has ever said that to me, but I still wonder this sometimes. I am a stage IV breast cancer survivor, and I’m proud to say that, because after 5 years, I’m still striving and thriving. I want people to not immediately think of metastatic disease as a death sentence. I want people to understand I still fight just as hard as people with stage I, II or III breast cancer. And as long as researchers continue to develop new medicines, we still have HOPE.

I was diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer in September 2009 while I was still on active duty in the military. When my doctor told me I had stage IV cancer, I asked, “How many stages are there?” She said, “Sheila, you have the top one.” Is stage IV breast cancer really a death sentence? My answer would be NO.

Still, when I found out I had metastatic breast cancer, my first thought was to ask God, “Am I going to die?” As the years passed, there have been so many different targeted therapies that have been approved for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. The advances in medicine have had a huge impact on my survivorship: I’m currently on Herceptin and Faslodex, and these two medicines have been working amazingly for me. My mother died of stage IV breast cancer in August 2004, and I wish I would have known more about the disease then. I wish she had had the medicines that I’ve been on these past couple of years – maybe she would have lived longer.

I’ve met so many amazing women with metastatic breast cancer and their journeys are truly amazing, as amazing as anyone diagnosed with this disease. However, as an African-American stage IV breast cancer survivor, I haven’t met many other African-American women with this diagnosis. When my mother faced this disease, cancer was not talked about too much in our community. It goes to show that it’s a subject that needs to be addressed and discussed in the African-American community. For African-American women, our mortality rate from breast cancer is much higher than it is for any other races. We need to talk about it. Continue reading

LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference is for You!

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LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, has a new look and feel. Catherine Ormerod, VP of Programs and Partnerships shares her highlights for the conference, taking place on Saturday, September 27, 2014 Philadelphia, PA.

Catherine-Ormerod 1Breast cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. It can be difficult to stay current with and understand the impact of these changes on you and your life. That’s why we have adapted this conference to connect you to trusted specific information. Consulting with some of the nation’s leading health specialists, this year’s conference will offer tracks to help you access the specific information that you’re seeking.

At the Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences conference you will get the unique medical information you seek for your specific type of breast cancer, while connecting you to others in a supportive environment. Our tracks are:

  • Triple-negative: presented in partnership with Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Hormone receptor-positive or HER2-positive
  • Metastatic

You can choose to follow a track or attend individual sessions based on your diagnosis or concerns. Our sessions will include information about the latest in breast cancer news, treatments and care and wellness. They will be presented by renowned breast cancer experts such as Virginia Borges, MD, MMSc; Clifford A. Hudis, MD; Rita Nanda, MD and Marisa C. Weiss. Topics will range from targeted therapies, metastatic breast cancer clinical trials, managing the side effects of chemotherapy and more, plus an engaging closing plenary, Thriving! A Discussion on Living Well – Body, Mind and Soul.

Attending a conference is a great way to not only get the latest information, but to connect with others and build a community of support. We often hear how long lasting friendships were created at LBBC conferences. I encourage you to take advantage of the many ways to share your experience – there will be breaks throughout the day, a special luncheon, closing reception and meetup groups organized by shared interests.

Registration for the conference is $50 per person but if you register before September 5th you will receive our early-bird discounted rate of $40 per person. We offer a limited number of travel grants and fee waivers on a first come, first served basis. Special thanks to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation’s for its support of travel grants to women diagnosed with triple-negative disease.

Visit lbbc.org/fallconference to register for the conference, apply for a fee waiver or travel grant and to learn more about our speakers and conference sessions.

I hope you can join us in Philadelphia this September!

Catherine Ormerod
VP, Programs and Partnerships, Living Beyond Breast Cancer
cormerod@lbbc.org
P.S. – Follow #LBBCconf on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for conference updates, staff picks on where to eat in our hometown of Philadelphia, what to see and much more!