Posts Tagged ‘young women’

Reflecting on the “Let’s Talk About It” Series Video Shoot

September 15, 2014

20140912LTAIbehindscenesOur Young Women’s Initiative recently launched two videos as part of the “Let’s Talk About It” Video Series. Arin Ahlum Hanson, MPH, CHES, manager of the Young Women’s Initiative, wrote this post about the day of the shoot and working with the young women and video crew who helped create the additions to this series.

I always have a hard time sleeping the night before running the video shoot for the Young Women’s Initiative Let’s Talk About It Video Series. Yes, since I’m managing the project my brain is swimming with logistics, which does make it hard to relax. But I mainly can’t sleep because I’m so excited. I’ve quickly learned that these video shoots are one of my favorite work days of the year. I’m excited to meet the amazing young women from across the nation who have agreed to be a part of our video project and want to share their experience to help other young women cope with breast cancer.

Each year, the video interview participants seem to have no hesitations about arriving, meeting the group of strangers running the video shoot and then quickly launching into in-depth conversations about subjects that rarely get talked about openly.

This year’s April video shoot was no different. Assembly, the video production team, arrived with a 10-member crew and quickly set up the shoot in a small hotel room. Together, we spent the next 12 hours filming. Eight young women and three healthcare providers participated in the video shoot. Some of the young women were nervous when they arrived but relaxed once the interview started. Others had fun learning new make-up tricks from our stylist. (more…)

“If I Can Make a Difference In ONE Person’s Life, Then I Know This Journey Was All Worth It”

September 9, 2014

imageToday we introduce Jessica, LBBC friend and guest blogger, who is sharing her breast cancer journey and how she came to discover LBBC’s Yoga on the Steps: Denver.

My journey started at the early age of 40 in late September of 2013 when I was sitting in what I call, ironically, my “happy place”. My happy place is a small chair in my bedroom next to  a large window where I look out at the mountains, decompress and think of my day, my family, what I am doing the next day or maybe what I am making for dinner. I remember standing up to go downstairs and feeling that something felt strange and cold. I checked under my shirt and saw that I had a small amount of discharge from one breast that had stained my shirt, and when I say small, I mean tiny – it was hardly visible. I changed my shirt and didn’t think twice about it and went on with my day which was having lunch with one of my best friends. We usually talk about our kids, school or maybe something our husbands did wrong the night before. That day, however, was different, for some reason we discussed what its like to get older, our aches and our pains. We laughed, and I remember the words I said to her exactly “at least you don’t have liquid coming out of your breast! A few more laughs and as always, I left, picked up my kiddos from school and went on with my daily routine.

 

A few hours later, I was sitting at home and got a call from this same friend. “Jess”, she said “I just talked to my Mom and I mentioned our discussion to her, the one where you told me about “liquid and breasts, her words to me were “My mom thinks you need to get it checked out, my Mom is a mammographer and she thinks it’s no joke”. Honestly, that is when my life changed, in an ironic twist of fate, a comment I made as a joke, saved my life.

(more…)

It’s About You: Kate Garza’s Story

August 26, 2014

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KateGarza2 for 5 28Kate Garza is back with a new blog post for our fall conference blogging series, It’s About You. The yoga instructor, writer, wife and mother of three discusses the “breast cancer journey” concept, while discussing her own and her anticipation of Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences.

Everyone calls it a journey – the breast cancer journey. And if I weren’t so sick of that term, I would use it, too. It is descriptive to a point, and it allows other people to remember that you are not living the life you had in mind anymore. But this so-called “journey” is really more the life equivalent of being kidnapped, thrown into the trunk of a car and driven in the dark to an unknown location. That’s the image that flares in my mind anyway, when I hear “journey with breast cancer,” a junket with only sketchy clues about where you may end up. 

I was diagnosed with stage II invasive breast cancer at age 53, almost 2 years ago now, when my kids were 15, 16 and 17 years old. Life would have been complex enough with three kids moving up and out, but throw breast cancer on top of that project and I had more moving parts than I could track with sophisticated software. 

I had a fairly garden variety diagnosis of estrogen receptor-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer. I followed the standard treatment with lumpectomy, 8 cycles of chemo and 30 doses of radiation therapy. It was the most difficult health crisis I had run across in my life and treatment left me exhausted and brain-fried, but grateful that I traversed without complication. I finished a week before number one graduated from high school. After a month off for R&R, I began taking an aromatase inhibitor (AI), letrozole. 

After 3 months of difficult joint pain side effects, I switched to anastrozole. Again, the difficulties with pain and mobility arrived, but I stayed with the second medicine for 6 months until, completely frustrated and full of pain with every movement, I gave up. I was done. I couldn’t see the point of prolonging a life that felt this bad. Did I mention that I am a yoga instructor? I couldn’t move. Not even enough to practice the yoga that might help me feel better. And working, in my chosen profession, was out of the question. So by the time my second child graduated this past June, I was 2 months into my medication vacation and starting to feel much better. I could move again. Pain with walking and the sleepless nights were beginning to fade away.  (more…)

Getting On Track – LBBC’s Reimagined Fall Conference

July 30, 2014

emailHeader760x160Our annual fall conference features three tracks because breast cancer is not just one disease. Clifford A. Hudis, MD, chief of the breast medicine service and attending physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, wrote this blog post about the reasons for these tracks and how breast cancer treatment became more individualized. A member of LBBC’s medical advisory board, Dr. Hudis will lead our morning plenary session on metastatic breast cancer. 

Hudis_lbbcblogpostGiven LBBC’s recognition that not all breast cancer is the same and not all patients need the same information, it is natural to see that the annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, is organized in tracks that enable participants to most efficiently focus on what they find to be most relevant. 

Not Just One Disease

Starting with oncology pioneer George Beatson’s 1896 report that some, but not all, women with advanced breast cancer responded to treatment that reduces estrogen in the body, it was clear that we confront more than one, uniform disease. The subsequent description of the estrogen receptor by cancer researcher Elwood Vernon Jensen in 1958 simply allowed us to test for what we already knew – that some cancers are more or less likely to respond to hormone therapies.

The more recent description of the human epidermal growth factor receptor–2 (HER2) and the development of effective treatments that target it added another dimension to “binning” breast cancers. With effective hormone and anti-HER2 therapies we can no longer pretend that cancer is cancer is cancer. One size does not fit all, and one disease is not the same as another.  (more…)

It’s About You: Lu Ann Cahn’s Story

July 23, 2014

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  Cahn_photo2014We would like to introduce you to our blogging series, “It’s About You.” In addition to telling you their personal story, our bloggers in this series talk about their experience with past LBBC programs and/or their anticipation for the upcoming fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences. Today, NBC10 reporter Lu Ann Cahn kicks off the series by sharing her breast cancer journey and the importance of connecting with individuals who share your experiences.

I was talking to a woman who just got through her second year of survivorship. We’d made a lunch date to talk about work, business opportunities.

I’d almost forgotten she’d had breast cancer until she mentioned she was dealing with horrendous hot flashes.

“The tamoxifen is making me crazy” she said.

“How are you feeling otherwise?” I asked

” Oh fine. I just want to forget about IT and move on.”

The IT she didn’t want to dwell on was Breast Cancer…and yet we spent the last twenty minutes we had together during our meeting, sharing our experiences, listening to each other.

I wished we’d started talking about it sooner. As much as she wanted to “forget”, I could tell it was a relief for her to talk to someone who has been there; someone who you don’t have to explain too much to, so much is already understood.

Her emotions were close to the surface; which is probably why she said she wanted to “forget about it”. Tears welled up in her eyes as she talked about how terrifying it’s been, the diagnosis, newly remarried, with a teen son.

I know . I remember.

It has been 23 years since I was diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer. My daughter was four years old. The year before breast cancer, I was hospitalized for 5 months. I had to have my colon removed because of severe ulcerative colitis. I was just recovering and feeling better when I started to feel a vague mass in my right breast. (more…)

LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference is for You!

July 16, 2014

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LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, has a new look and feel. Catherine Ormerod, VP of Programs and Partnerships shares her highlights for the conference, taking place on Saturday, September 27, 2014 Philadelphia, PA.

Catherine-Ormerod 1Breast cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. It can be difficult to stay current with and understand the impact of these changes on you and your life. That’s why we have adapted this conference to connect you to trusted specific information. Consulting with some of the nation’s leading health specialists, this year’s conference will offer tracks to help you access the specific information that you’re seeking.

At the Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences conference you will get the unique medical information you seek for your specific type of breast cancer, while connecting you to others in a supportive environment. Our tracks are:

  • Triple-negative: presented in partnership with Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Hormone receptor-positive or HER2-positive
  • Metastatic

You can choose to follow a track or attend individual sessions based on your diagnosis or concerns. Our sessions will include information about the latest in breast cancer news, treatments and care and wellness. They will be presented by renowned breast cancer experts such as Virginia Borges, MD, MMSc; Clifford A. Hudis, MD; Rita Nanda, MD and Marisa C. Weiss. Topics will range from targeted therapies, metastatic breast cancer clinical trials, managing the side effects of chemotherapy and more, plus an engaging closing plenary, Thriving! A Discussion on Living Well – Body, Mind and Soul.

Attending a conference is a great way to not only get the latest information, but to connect with others and build a community of support. We often hear how long lasting friendships were created at LBBC conferences. I encourage you to take advantage of the many ways to share your experience – there will be breaks throughout the day, a special luncheon, closing reception and meetup groups organized by shared interests.

Registration for the conference is $50 per person but if you register before September 5th you will receive our early-bird discounted rate of $40 per person. We offer a limited number of travel grants and fee waivers on a first come, first served basis. Special thanks to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation’s for its support of travel grants to women diagnosed with triple-negative disease.

Visit lbbc.org/fallconference to register for the conference, apply for a fee waiver or travel grant and to learn more about our speakers and conference sessions.

I hope you can join us in Philadelphia this September!

Catherine Ormerod
VP, Programs and Partnerships, Living Beyond Breast Cancer
cormerod@lbbc.org
P.S. – Follow #LBBCconf on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for conference updates, staff picks on where to eat in our hometown of Philadelphia, what to see and much more!

I’ve Reached a Milestone…My Halfway Mark

June 20, 2014

Tiff Smiling Tiffany Mannino is back sharing another ‘Dear Lola’ journal entry with us; letters penned to her future daughter about her breast cancer experience. This time she shares her thoughts and feelings about being halfway through her chemotherapy treatment…

 

April 19, 2010

Dear Lola,

I know it has been quite a long time since I’ve written. Although I have thought about you every single day, the truth is, I have not wanted to share with you how I’ve been feeling. I always envisioned that what I would write to you would inspire and uplift you as I am a firm believer in finding the positive in every situation.  Truthfully, I’m having an incredibly difficult time finding the light in the midst of darkness at the moment as I’m going through such a challenging time in my life.

The last time I wrote to you was on the eve of my first chemo treatment. I was filled with great anxiety and anticipation. Well, now I should be celebrating because I’ve reached a milestone…my halfway mark. It has been eight weeks, and I have completed four of my eight treatments. Although I’m thrilled to be halfway done, I’ll admit, that doesn’t replace the dread I feel that I still have four more! I’m not going to sugarcoat it, chemo totally sucks!

Going through chemo for me has hands-down been the most difficult part of the breast cancer journey and truthfully, the hardest thing I thing I’ve ever faced. Each treatment has brought on a different set of challenges to face.

The first treatment made me violently ill to the point I was practically vomiting up my intestines. I remember lying in bed at 3 o’clock in the morning writhing and crying out to my mom, begging her to make it stop. In between tears, I pleaded with God to take away my pain. At that moment, my mother wrapped her entire body around me and with tears in her eyes, just held me like a baby. It is amazing to me as a 36 year old adult, how much I wanted and needed my mother as if I were a little child once again. In that moment, I realized that we never, ever outgrow our mothers and the need for their love and care. (more…)

Yoga: A Survivor’s Tool for Strength

May 27, 2014

KateGarza2 for 5 28Kate Garza is a mother of three teenagers, cancer survivor and yoga instructor in Cheltenham. Her “Team Kangaroo-om”  participated in our event, Yoga on the Steps: Philadelphia, on Sunday, May 18.  For more information or to register for a Yoga event near you, visit yogaonthesteps.org. Read Kate’s blog at LotsaHelpingHands.com.

I climbed the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum last Sunday for Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s Yoga On The Steps, a sun drenched block party of yoga enthusiasts and breast cancer affiliates. Occasionally my thoughts traveled back to last year’s event, which I attended during my own active treatment, bandanna wrapped around my chemo-bald head. On that gray day a year ago I felt as bad as the cold fog and drizzle that enshrouded the steps.

But last Sunday, bathed in sunshine, I shook off a year and a half of living with breast cancer treatment. I gathered with a large team from my kids’ high school, faculty and students together. I was there to give and gain support and to advance LBBC’s mission of bringing patients together with resources throughout the journey, one that can thankfully now include many years of health beyond treatment.

Cancer survivors have long had an intuitive sense that yoga helps body and mind, but now we have studies to prove it. In March, the Journal of Clinical Oncology published a study of 191 breast cancer patients by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. It linked yoga to improvements in self-reported quality of life, including measures of mood, pain and fatigue. Practicing yoga also appeared to help regulate the stress hormone cortisol, which is tied to poor survival among breast cancer patients.

Aware of these unique qualities of yoga, Living Beyond Breast Cancer has held Yoga on the Steps as its signature fundraising event since 2001, and in recent years has expanded to other cities — this July in Kansas City and September in Denver. Last year, LBBC, the Ardmore-based national education and support organization, published a Guide to Understanding Yoga and Breast Cancer, detailing the benefits of yoga to coping with anxiety, fatigue, strength and body image.

But what exactly is it about yoga that helps? (more…)

Be Your Own Advocate: Don’t Be Afraid To Ask For A Second Opinion

May 25, 2014

Tonya Head ShotToday guest blogger, Tonya Priestley shares her story about following her intuition after being reassured nothing was wrong following an abnormal mammogram. She insisted on a second opinion which ultimately lead to her being diagnosed with ER/PR-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)…

On my 38th birthday, I gifted myself a mammogram. I had no signs or symptoms, no family history, and no doctor’s referral, but decided to move forward with a screening after seeing a close friend of mine struggle with very aggressive breast cancer. After the mammogram and a needle biopsy identified some calcifications, I was told that I didn’t need to worry because I did not have breast cancer, rather I just had some atypical cells.

The words ‘atypical cells’ didn’t settle well with me. I requested a copy of the results and called a nurse for an opinion. The nurse told me that I needed to see a surgeon.

The surgeon conducted a lumpectomy, which was a short surgery but a painful recovery process – physically and emotionally. I woke up cold and was given pain medication, a kind of narcotic, and immediately threw up. Then I received the news from the surgeon: the lumpectomy confirmed that I in fact did have breast cancer. I was diagnosed with ER/PR-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (more…)

Do You Have Any Idea How Beautiful You Are?

May 17, 2014

Musser_Barbara_2014Breast cancer can drum up many complex emotions and thoughts for those who are newly diagnosed, especially around body image. Barbara Musser, CEO and founder of Sexy After Cancer, writes about the importance of defining your own beauty and invites you to learn how to do this by joining us for our free webinar at noon ET/11 a.m. CT on Tuesday, May 20, held in partnership with Susan G. Komen of Greater Kansas City

Dealing with a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is a big challenge that goes on for quite a while. On top of that, it’s easy to feel like less of a woman, especially with altered or removed breasts, instant menopause resulting from chemo or hormonal therapies and other physical changes that can happen.  There’s not a lot of conversation about our body image, self-esteem and self-love and our intimate and sexual lives. And yet these are the subjects that have the most to do with the quality of our lives.

It’s the elephant in the room that no one mentions. Partly it’s because these aren’t easy topics to broach and partly because we don’t know to ask about them if we don’t know what to expect. You may have experienced this spiral. (more…)


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