Posts Tagged ‘writing the journey’

Poetry By Judy Koza

February 11, 2014

Judy

LBBC’s Writing the Journey is a 6-part workshop series lead by instructor Alysa Cummings designed to help you express and document your thoughts and feelings about your journey with breast cancer. Whether you are newly diagnosed, have recently completed treatment, are years beyond treatment, or are living with metastatic breast cancer, this writing series offers you a safe and creative outlet for processing and coping with your experience. No previous writing experience is necessary! Just ask Judy Koza, a former Writing the Journey participant who has been kind enough to share three of her poems with us today…

Cancer Scripts

I write as I speak, with reservedness
dealing with cancer with utmost control
Seeing the cancer world only through you
And him and her and everyone but me
I have over, or maybe under thought
All things cancer, to the point of blocking
Hiding, pushing, banishing it from me
I have willed it away, oh such restraint
To disconnect the beast from my body
And my everyday mind, not wanting to,
Not daring to connect with the “why me”
What lies on the other side of my fear
Do I peek over the wall to learn, or
Am I destined to recoil forever?

(more…)

Writing The Journey Spring Series Is Here!

January 28, 2014

Cummings-Alysa_mediumWriting can be healing. That’s the big idea behind this spring’s six part Writing the Journey series to be held at the Cherry Hill (NJ) Public Library beginning March 11th and registration is now open! The group will be facilitated by Alysa Cummings, breast cancer survivor and author of Greetings from CancerLand which can be purchased on Amazon.

 

Here she shares an excerpt from her book:

 

Magical Thinking

 

I was thinking as small children think, as if my thoughts or wishes had the power to reverse the narrative, change the outcome.
-Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking

If you’re a cancer survivor like me, you just might be as guilty of it as I once was.

Guilty of magical thinking, that is.

I remember the first time it happened to me; I had been in CancerLand for a few weeks. The initial shock of the words I’m sorry, you have cancer had started wearing off, but ever so slightly. (Trust me on that one).

Slowly but surely I was taking baby steps toward my post-diagnosis “new normal.” Case in point: I could actually carry on a civil conversation with someone without crying my eyes out. This was no small feat. And let the record show that I was eating and sleeping normally again, showing up for work every morning and paying my bills on time. All things considered, we’re talking fairly high-functional here! At least, that was my goal. (more…)


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