What to Get for Women Who Have Cancer: A Gift Giving Guide

Jenny Burkholder 2013With the holidays quickly approaching, LBBC Breast Cancer Helpline volunteer, Jenny Burkholder, shares her tips on gift giving for someone you love who has breast cancer. 

Last week, a colleague approached me to talk about her sister-in-law, who is about to have a lumpectomy and radiation. I assumed she wanted to talk about cancer. I was more than happy to lend my insights, but what I realized was that what she was asking me was: what can I get for a woman who has cancer? I asked her to clarify, and what she was actually asking me was: what can I buy for her so she can feel better about this whole ugly situation? And maybe she was also saying was: what can I buy for her, so I can feel better about this whole ugly situation? Either way, I’m all for gift giving; everyone benefits.

I have to admit, one of the unexpected by-products of having cancer was that I received a number of thoughtful and inspired gifts. When I say gifts, what I mean is I received many tangible items, from writing journals to pillow cases, to already read and loved books, to comfortable pajamas and organic skincare products. I also received many intangible things, like support and love, guidance and friendship. I was more than happy to receive these things because they did make me feel better, and now when I meet a woman who has been diagnosed, I send her a gift. I have given headscarves and writing journals, big hoop earrings and organic skincare products. I have also given phone calls and hugs.

So in thinking about my gift giving, I have devised a list of both tangible and intangible gifts that one can give and ask for this season and beyond. Continue reading

Living with Breast Cancer: Access the Health Insurance You Deserve

Anne-FilipicThe open enrollment period for the Health Insurance Marketplace began last month and goes until February 15, 2015. In this guest post, Anne Filipic, President of Enroll America, blogs about the changes in health insurance in the last few years and how they impact women affected by breast cancer. 

 

Until recently, pre-existing conditions have kept many women from getting the health insurance necessary to diagnose and treat their illness. So, at a time when they needed health insurance to help save their lives, many were left facing the full cost of hefty medical bills on their own. With hundreds of thousands of dollars in doctor visits, tests, medication, and more, it’s a cost that many couldn’t afford.

As a cancer survivor, you may have been turned down or charged more for health insurance in the past. But now, that is no longer an issue. Having a pre-existing condition can no longer prevent you from getting quality, affordable coverage. And you can’t be charged more for health insurance because of your medical history. This is true even if you’ve previously been turned down or charged more for coverage due to a pre-existing condition.

Now, hundreds of thousands of women who are fighting breast cancer have access to the life-saving medical care they need. In addition, preventive care for key services is now free, such as breast cancer genetic test counseling (BRCA) for women at higher risk for breast cancer, mammograms every one to two years for women over age 40, and breast cancer chemoprevention counseling for women at higher risk.  Continue reading

My Caregiver, My Friend, My Sister

November is National Family Caregivers Month, and we’re marking it with a special blog post by Lynn Folkman, our community engagement manager. Lynn writes about her sister, Deb, who offered tremendous love and support to Lynn throughout her experience with breast cancer.

Deb and LynnMy sister and I were standing near the finish line for the Philadelphia Marathon this past weekend. We were eagerly waiting to catch a glimpse of my nephew and his fiancé so we could cheer and support them as they ran. While waiting to see them pass by, I enthusiastically cheered and clapped for all those running the marathon. I was overwhelmed at the number of all of those present showing support to those they love. With my sister by my side, I thought that she should be cheered for in the same manner as my caregiver.

Let me start by saying, I love my sister Deb. She is quite reserved and is one who does not like being in the spotlight. She has one of the biggest hearts and is one of the most giving and caring individuals I know. I have thanked her many times in a variety of ways to acknowledge her support during my breast cancer diagnosis and treatment; yet, I don’t think she fully understands the enormous positive impact that her caregiving had on my healing.

My sister and I were always close. During the time we shared as co-caregivers for my mom, who had laryngeal cancer, our bond became that much stronger.  Two months after my mother passed away, I had my annual mammogram. Two weeks after the results of my normal mammogram, I had a pain underneath my arm. Although my sister is no longer a practicing nurse, I asked her opinion. She encouraged me to go to the doctor for more information. The initial doctors visit led me first to an x-ray and then to an ultrasound, which was suspicious, and then on to a needle/core biopsy. My sister insisted on coming with me to the biopsy, and so her journey of being my caregiver began. I waited a few weeks for the biopsy results, but quite honestly after I heard the doctor say that 90 percent of these are benign, the thought of cancer left my mind. I was about to leave for a business trip for Miami when I received the call at work about my breast cancer diagnosis. Stunned and shocked, I hung up the phone and immediately called my sister. Her husband answered the phone and I managed to utter Deb’s name. He could tell that I was upset and my sister quickly picked up the phone. I was desperately trying to breathe, I gasped to find my voice to utter actual words, but ultimately found myself unable to speak. However, no words were required, the silence mixed with sobbing said it all – she understood, I had breast cancer. Continue reading

Giving Tuesday 2014

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We have a day for giving thanks. We have two for shopping. Now, we have #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back! Giving Tuesday is a day for charities, families, businesses, community centers and students around the world to come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give back. LBBC is excited to announce that we will be a part of Giving Tuesday 2014 on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 and as a participating charity, we’re asking that you help us by spreading the word about Living Beyond Breast Cancer by being a part of our #LBBCUnselfie campaign.

 

Simply share a picture of yourself on your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram account holding a sign that reads “I am #LBBCUnselfie” and caption the image with why or how you support Living Beyond Breast Cancer. Your support can be anything from why you participate in LBBC’s programs and services to why you donate or volunteer at events, or it can be in honor of someone you know who has breast cancer and uses LBBC’s services. It’s completely up to you! Just make sure you use #LBBCUnselfie in your caption so we can re-tweet, re-gram and add your Facebook photo to the #LBBCUnselfie photo album on our Facebook page. We can’t wait to see the #LBBCUnSelfie images on Giving Tuesday – but posting your photos today so you can be featured first on Giving Tuesday!

 
Here are some example of #LBBCUnSelfie posts:

 

LBBCUnselfie2 LBBCUnselfie1

 

Help us spread the word and hopefully everyone can learn about Living Beyond Breast Cancer and share why they too are #LBBCUnselfie!

Healthy Recipes to Include in Your Holiday Tradition

With Thanksgiving in three days, the holiday season is officially in full swing. In anticipation of our December 3 Twitter chat, #LBBCchat: Healthy Eating After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Kendall Scott, co-founder and health coach of The Kicking Kitchenis back on our blog to share three recipes to add to your holiday feast.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Savory Stuffed Acorn Squash

I love making stuffed squash: It fills my kitchen with sweet and savory scents and fills me up without feeling bloated and tired afterward. My mother-in-law also makes her own delicious version of stuffed squash. She gave me the idea to make them up ahead of time, wrapping each half of a stuffed squash in aluminum foil, baking some immediately to enjoy now and storing the rest in the fridge for up to three days. Then you just pop them in the oven and they’re ready to eat in an hour!

Yield: makes 4 stuffed squash halves

Ingredients:

1/2 cup brown rice

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/4 red onion, finely chopped

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 small zucchini, small chop

2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped

5 crimini mushrooms, finely chopped

2 cups baby spinach, loosely packed

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1/4 cup nutritional yeast

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Dash of  pepper Continue reading

18 Months Post and Chemobrain

RondaWalker-27LBBC Breast Cancer Helpline volunteer, blogger and friend Ronda Walker Weaver is back today to discuss her experience with “chemobrain” and what she learned about the topic from a webinar LBBC hosted in September of 2014. 

Well, happy day here. Not that I was expecting anything different than what I received, but I tell you, the anniversary anxiety, which comes every 3 months for the first 2 years, is tough. I look at these doctors’ visits as markers of moving past and beyond breast cancer, but they are also reminders of where I was, and quite frankly, where I could be, if any indicators were there.

So – great blood pressure, great weight, mammogram was clear, and I’m just waiting to hear about blood tests – red and white blood cell counts. But I don’t expect anything other than “all is well.” Continue reading

“Cancer, Without You, I Wouldn’t Be The Woman I Am Today”

Dana-Donofree-BioDana Donofree is back on the LBBC blog for part 3 of her story about her breast cancer diagnosis and how it led her towards a completely different life and career direction than she had originally planned…

Cancer had officially taken my life on another path. Only this time, it was one I had always wanted: designing my own line and having my own business.  The concept for AnaOno Intimates came organically from within. After cancer and reconstructions, I’d walked into lingerie stores countless times, enthusiastic at first, but then leaving with nothing but self-loathing and tears because my body was forever altered. It was like I was back in my cancer treatment days, easily identifiable by my head scarf or lack of eyebrows and eyelashes. This time I was walking around with a giant, heavy stamp on my chest: NOT NORMAL. The sheer frustration  became absolutely maddening, but the pain of being “different” or “changed” or in some dark moments, “ruined” was unbearable. I made my mind up, I knew in that moment I never wanted another woman to EVER have to go through what I did; they should feel just as beautiful, confident and sexy as they did the days before reconstructive surgery. Cancer should not and WILL NOT take that away. Continue reading