Healthy Recipes to Include in Your Holiday Tradition

With Thanksgiving in three days, the holiday season is officially in full swing. In anticipation of our December 3 Twitter chat, #LBBCchat: Healthy Eating After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Kendall Scott, co-founder and health coach of The Kicking Kitchenis back on our blog to share three recipes to add to your holiday feast.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Image via Kendall Scott/The Kicking Kitchen.

Savory Stuffed Acorn Squash

I love making stuffed squash: It fills my kitchen with sweet and savory scents and fills me up without feeling bloated and tired afterward. My mother-in-law also makes her own delicious version of stuffed squash. She gave me the idea to make them up ahead of time, wrapping each half of a stuffed squash in aluminum foil, baking some immediately to enjoy now and storing the rest in the fridge for up to three days. Then you just pop them in the oven and they’re ready to eat in an hour!

Yield: makes 4 stuffed squash halves

Ingredients:

1/2 cup brown rice

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/4 red onion, finely chopped

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 small zucchini, small chop

2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped

5 crimini mushrooms, finely chopped

2 cups baby spinach, loosely packed

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon ground cumin

1/4 cup nutritional yeast

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Dash of  pepper Continue reading

Resilience and Breast Cancer

Rocky Mountain Cancer Center.  April 17, 2014.  Photo by Ellen JaskolResearch shows resilience can ease stress and improve life satisfaction among people diagnosed with cancer, but what does it mean to be “resilient”? In anticipation of our November 18 community meeting in Denver, Colorado, Jill Mitchell, LCSW, PhD, OSW-C, of the Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers offers some insight and tips on being resilient.

In physics, “resilience” is defined as the ability of a material to absorb energy when it is deformed, and to release that energy (bounce back).  The limit of resilience, in turn, is the point at which the material can no longer absorb energy elastically without creating a permanent distortion.

But resilience in the cancer world, is not as much about bouncing “back” as it is about bouncing “forward” – creating a “new normal” or even growing through the process of survivorship.

Resilience goes beyond just coping or just being “elastic.” It often also involves (or sometimes demands) a “permanent distortion in one’s life” (such as a loss of a breast, or a job or an anticipated future, for example).  However, it is these “distortions,” or losses, that can provide the fodder for growth and transformation when we call upon our internal resources (self-esteem, optimism, hopefulness, problem solving) and our external resources (friends and family, social and community support).

I am often awed and humbled by the ways in which people come to cope with and grow through the struggles or suffering they endure due to cancer.  One of the most important things to know is that although some people may have a more natural tendency toward resilience, we all can strengthen our ability toward resilience through a few specific strategies:

Start with your strengths – what already works for you, or has worked for you in the past?  Perhaps you are someone who needs to gather a lot of information.  Perhaps you feel rejuvenated being surrounded by nature, or writing in a journal or meditating.  Remind yourself about the strategies you already know help you to cope, and make time for those!  Resilience is about developing realistic goals and moving toward them.  Start with what works for you.

Develop and use your network of support – Share what you’re going through with your trusted loved ones, friends, and peers.   Explore support groups or consult one-on-one with your oncology social worker or other healthcare professionals who can be a resource for support, processing and validation.  Asking for help and sharing your thoughts and feelings with someone you trust can feel challenging and uncomfortable for people who are used to being in control or self-dependent. And yet, social support is a critical cornerstone for resilience.  Continue reading

Writer Gives Tour of Breast Cancer Journey, from A to Z

The cover of Madhulika Sikka's book, "A Breast Cancer Alphabet." (image via http://www.abreastcanceralphabet.com/)

The cover of Madhulika Sikka’s book, “A Breast Cancer Alphabet.” (image via http://www.abreastcanceralphabet.com/)

LBBC Writer and Editorial Coordinator Erin Rowley reviews Madhulika Sikka’s book, A Breast Cancer Alphabet.

Cancerland is a place you never planned to visit. Author Madhulika Sikka didn’t want to go there either. But through her book, A Breast Cancer Alphabet, she volunteers to be your tour guide as you navigate life after a breast cancer diagnosis. “This book,” she says, “is for all of you who have become members of a club you did not want to join,” as well as for your friends and family members.

A Breast Cancer Alphabet is a quick read – Ms. Sikka, a broadcast journalist who was diagnosed in 2010, writes that she wanted “a short book that wouldn’t tax my chemo-addled brain.” But she manages to address many topics, from the more obvious ones (B is for Breasts, D is for Drugs, M is for Mastectomy) to ones that may seem frivolous next to the question of survival, but are important to your quality of life (S is for Sex, H is for Hair, L is for Looks, F is for Fashion Accessories). In the chapter T is for Therapy, she stresses that treatment should go beyond chemotherapy and physical therapy. She says it should include psychotherapy and aspects of everyday life that are therapeutic for you, like watching a marathon of your favorite TV show or staying in bed (P is for Pillows, X is for eXhaustion, Z is for ZZZ’s.) Continue reading

A Moment in Time: The Survivorship Care Plan and Follow-Up Care as a Standard of Care

Barbara Unell PhotoBarbara C. Unell is the founder of Back in the Swing USA® and co-author of The Back in the Swing Cookbook: Recipes for Eating and Living Well Every Day After Breast Cancer. Ms. Unell wrote this blog post in anticipation of our upcoming town hall meeting, Survivorship 360: Navigating Your Way Through the Re-Designed Breast Cancer Roadmap.

I love the new song, “3 Things,” by Jason Mraz. In fact, I love it so much, that I decided to make it the theme of this blog, using a bit of poetic license to play off of Mraz’s message. He sings about the three things that he does “when his life falls apart.” 

His words resonate with me today, as I reflect on this particular moment in time in the history of breast cancer survivorship healthcare, a field in which I have planted seeds, along with hundreds of caring volunteers, dedicated healthcare professionals and generous sponsors, for the past 15 years.  I hope that you will take a moment (3 minutes, actually) to sit back, listen to Mraz’s song and be inspired, too.

The song’s lyrics remind me of my “new life” that started in the exhilarating days of 1999, after my treatment for breast cancer, when I was focused on “changing the conversation” between physician and patient. As an author, educator and social entrepreneur who is committed to translating scientific research into practical action, I was determined to move that conversation for consumers of cancer healthcare from the anxiety-filled moments of asking, “Now what?” to the confident steps of receiving a comprehensive, personalized survivorship care plan and follow-up recommendations during and/or after primary treatment ends. Continue reading

From Silent to Vocal, Invisible to Visible, Underserved to Served

2012JeanSachsHeadshotVer2WebWhy LBBC Programs Focus on Metastatic Breast Cancer in October

By Jean Sachs, MSS, MLSP
CEO, LBBC

For nearly two decades I have dedicated my professional life to educating and supporting women, men and families whose lives have been impacted by breast cancer.  Over these years I have met so many incredible people who have faced this disease with courage and grace.  Every time I meet someone living with metastatic breast cancer, her story has a profound impact on me. LBBC is and has been committed to being there for these women and men.

In 2006, LBBC learned through its groundbreaking survey of women with metastatic breast cancer what I had heard so many times from my conversations with women living with the disease.  They often felt alone, poorly understood and served. The survey’s title, Silent Voices: Women with Advanced (Metastatic) Breast Cancer Share Their Needs and Preferences for Information, Support and Practical Resources, reflected this.

Before our study, women with MBC had never been asked about their needs as they faced the reality of a diagnosis that means they will always be in treatment. The survey also told us how isolated and alone women with MBC feel within the larger breast cancer community, especially during October when the focus of Breast Cancer Awareness Month skews heavily toward those newly diagnosed or whose treatment has ended—those who appear, at least on the surface, to be doing well.

LBBC took the information shared by our MBC survey respondents and began developing programs specifically for women with MBC to educate, connect and support them. Our Annual Conference for Women Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was founded in 2007, and specialized guides, webinars and peer support soon followed. We began to focus our October educational programs toward MBC.

Thirteen personal stories will be posted over 13 hours, written by women and men living with metastatic disease, their caregivers and healthcare professionals. The posts will appear on a special webpage on lbbc.org as well as on our organizational blog, livingbeyondbc.wordpress.com. Going forward, the LBBC Blog will feature at least one MBC focused post a month under the Hear My Voice banner.

It is my hope that this October the national conversation will start shifting to include more messages about MBC and many more voices discussing it year round. National organizations, including LBBC, have already formed the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (MBCA), a group of patient advocacy organizations and industry partners seeking to improve the lives of and outcomes for those with metastatic breast cancer and their families. MBCA seeks to increase awareness and education about the disease, advance policy and strategic coordination of research funding. This group will release a landscape analysis of MBC research and services on October 13.  Together we have a louder voice and more strength to respond to the needs of those living with metastatic breast cancer.

All of this brings me back to my intertwined personal and professional commitment to LBBC- creating a world where no one impacted by breast cancer feels uninformed or alone. Our work continues.

Join Our Annual Fall Conference From the Comfort Of Your Home

If you can’t come to our annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, you can still join us for the live webstream of our morning and closing plenary sessions. Read below to learn more about our webstreams.

eblastSquare400x400 copylivewebstreams copyYou may be in the middle of breast cancer treatment. You may be a single parent and can’t attend a conference far away. Other reasons make it difficult for you to travel long-distance.

At Living Beyond Breast Cancer, we understand that you may experience obstacles that prevent you from attending a national conference that isn’t within an easy driving distance or close to public transportation. That’s why we’re bringing parts of the conference to you through free, live webstreams!

Join us on Saturday, September 27, from the comfort of your own home. Watch our morning and closing plenary sessions and ask our experts your questions! Through our webstreaming, you will be able to watch:

Morning Sessions 9:30 – 10:45 a.m. (ET)

  • Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: What We Know, What We Are Learning, How You Can Help with Rita Nanda, MD (presented in partnership with Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation)
  • Hormone Receptor-Positive or HER2+ Breast Cancer: What’s New in Targeted Therapies with Virginia Borges, MD, MMSc
  • Metastatic Breast Cancer: Treatment Strategies with Clifford A. Hudis, MD

Closing Sessions 4 – 5 p.m. (ET)

  • Thriving! A Discussion on Living Well—Body, Mind and Soul with Virginia Borges, MD, MMSc Lisa McLaughlin, MSW, LSW, OSW-C, and Marisa C. Weiss, MD

Continue reading

It’s About You: Lynn Folkman’s Story

emailHeader760x1604_BlogResizeAt this year’s annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, we’re not just providing you with the unique information you seek; we’re offering you the chance to connect with others and learn that you’re not alone.  While being treated for breast cancer, Lynn Folkman went to her first-ever LBBC fall conference in 2009. She blogs about that day and the importance of creating the conference experience you want. Lucky for us, Lynn joined the team at Living Beyond Breast Cancer in 2012 as our Community Engagement Manager.

Lynn Folkman LBBC Fall ConferenceIt was fall 2009 – I had just completed chemotherapy, radiation therapy and was a few months into my year of taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) and I was exhausted. I found out about the LBBC Annual Fall Conference through one of my support groups and the thought of attending alone was too overwhelming for me, so I agreed to attend with a friend I met during treatment.

The conference that year was held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. I was a bit nervous about attending, as I had previously worked at the Convention Center and still knew quite a few people there, and they did not know that I had breast cancer. As well, the tables were turned; I was a meeting planner and instead of producing the event, I was experiencing the conference as an attendee.

I was in an emotionally raw and vulnerable state. I was at the point in my treatment where I often wondered if or when I would ever feel like myself again. I was tired of hearing the comment, “You look really great!” I longed for a day where I could be invisible and no one would know that I had breast cancer. However, I was still mostly bald and there was no masking what I was currently experiencing. I was apprehensive about having to endure glances from people who knew me, which would be mixed with a combination of sympathy and trepidation.  They were used to the vivacious energetic Lynn, not the exhausted Lynn.  How could I possibly fake it when I did not even have the energy to do so?

A few things occurred that day which continue to deeply comfort my mind and spirit and reinforce the special place in my heart for the LBBC Fall Conference. Since it was my first time attending, I had no idea what to expect. The day began with the opening session, the speaker welcomed the group and then asked people how far out they were from the time of their diagnosis. When your year was called, you were instructed to raise your hand. One year and under, my hand went up. I don’t remember the exact breakdown, but it went something like this: 1-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-15 years, more than 15 years and so on.  What I do remember is being overwhelmed as I heard cheers and looked around the room and saw so many raised hands and proudly smiling faces.   Continue reading