Now Life Is Forever Altered

1493LBBC shop to support partner and blogger, Dana Donofree, is back sharing the 2nd part of her breast cancer story with us. To read part 1 click here. Today she shares how her surgery lead to life and career changing ideas and how it has directed her path for the future.

The positive to my diagnosis, if ever there could be one, was that I was HER2+. This made me a candidate for Herceptin. Before 2006, Herceptin was only used in late-stage cancers, but by the time of my diagnosis, it was approved to treat HER2+, and it had a very favorable success rate in battling the disease.

I kept thinking about the women before me with the same diagnosis prior to 2006. There were many who died waiting for the approval. There were many who died because they weren’t the right candidate. And now, there were many like me benefiting from the research and dollars drummed up by pink ribbons, walks and the memories of those women who were lost. I was grateful beyond words. Who is to say one way or another, but I believe the access to Herceptin saved my life.

There is a wave of fear, anxiety and doubt that follows the flood of joy when your cancer doctor releases you from care with clear scans and positive words. It is almost even more overwhelming than the fear that greets us survivors upon diagnosis. Because now life is forever altered. Now there is nothing but a new set of what-ifs with no real solutions to challenge them. Now I had to go back to life without cancer, but a life very different than the one BEFORE cancer. People like to call it the “new normal.” And I woke every day to a different battle ahead of me; one that was about restoring myself to some semblance of the Dana I was before the disease. Continue reading

White House | Black Market Supports LBBC

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Today on the LBBC blog, White House | Black Market president Donna Noce discusses the long-standing partnership between LBBC and White House | Black Market and why they continue to support LBBC, not only during Breast Cancer Awareness Month but also Beyond October…

“I feel very strongly that we use the power that we have as a brand and an organization to support something that’s really good.” Donna Noce, President, White House | Black Market

Living Beyond Breast Cancer connects people to trusted breast cancer information and a community of support. Donna Noce is president of White House | Black Market, an international fashion boutique. Since 2004, together with its sister brands, Chico’s, Soma, and Boston Proper, WHBM has donated more than $2.1 million in support of LBBC.

Over the years, WHBM has supported LBBC through the sale of limited-edition products, register donations, in-boutique events and a dedicated mailer in October. In 2010, when White House | Black Market celebrated its 25th anniversary, they also honored 25 women fighting the disease. That same year, WHBM received LBBC’s Corporate Leadership Award.

On Living Beyond Breast Cancer

When I was first learning about Living Beyond Breast Cancer (LBBC), what struck me most was their commitment to creating a place where everyone touched by the disease could go for information and support. Through LBBC, I also learned about the complex challenges facing women after diagnosis, as well as during treatment, recovery and disease management. LBBC hears and respects women tremendously, regardless of age, stage of disease, background or identity. And it gives each person a voice.

On Breast Cancer Awareness Month

We believe that it’s important to recognize the role Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM) has played in raising consciousness about the disease. However, one of the many reasons we’ve remained loyal to our partnership with LBBC is that they’re doing so much more. They educate and empower women by making incredibly complex information easy to understand, and creating a community of peers, patients, caregivers and medical professionals to offer thoughtful and compassionate guidance.

This year WHBM is supporting LBBC through the sale of limited-edition products, register donations, in-boutique events, and an exciting new social media initiative, through which followers of WHBM’s social channels are encouraged to add a pink filter to their profile pictures. WHBM will donate $1 for every profile pic, up to 25K.

Beyond October

The numbers prove that breast cancer doesn’t discriminate according to a month on the calendar:

  • 98% of breast cancer diagnoses occur in women
  • One woman in 8 women will be diagnosed with a form of the disease in her lifetime
  • Six to 10% of newly diagnosed women and 30% of women re-diagnosed after being treated for early-stage breast cancer will learn they have metastatic disease (meaning that the cancer has progressed from the breast to another organ in the body)

We are deeply aware of these sobering statistics, and are honored that our year-round support of LBBC served as the inspiration for the organization’s newly launched Beyond October initiative.

As a founding corporate partner of Beyond October, we will continue to demonstrate our commitment to those who depend on LBBC’s services by providing financial and promotional support of the organization’s programs and projects – not just in October but throughout the year.

We are committed to ensuring that each and every woman who shops at White House Black Market is aware that there is a safe and trusted place she can turn to for help, information, and support.

For more information about the items available from White House | Black Market supporting LBBC please click here.

“If I Can Make a Difference In ONE Person’s Life, Then I Know This Journey Was All Worth It”

imageToday we introduce Jessica, LBBC friend and guest blogger, who is sharing her breast cancer journey and how she came to discover LBBC’s Yoga on the Steps: Denver.

My journey started at the early age of 40 in late September of 2013 when I was sitting in what I call, ironically, my “happy place”. My happy place is a small chair in my bedroom next to  a large window where I look out at the mountains, decompress and think of my day, my family, what I am doing the next day or maybe what I am making for dinner. I remember standing up to go downstairs and feeling that something felt strange and cold. I checked under my shirt and saw that I had a small amount of discharge from one breast that had stained my shirt, and when I say small, I mean tiny – it was hardly visible. I changed my shirt and didn’t think twice about it and went on with my day which was having lunch with one of my best friends. We usually talk about our kids, school or maybe something our husbands did wrong the night before. That day, however, was different, for some reason we discussed what its like to get older, our aches and our pains. We laughed, and I remember the words I said to her exactly “at least you don’t have liquid coming out of your breast! A few more laughs and as always, I left, picked up my kiddos from school and went on with my daily routine.

 

A few hours later, I was sitting at home and got a call from this same friend. “Jess”, she said “I just talked to my Mom and I mentioned our discussion to her, the one where you told me about “liquid and breasts, her words to me were “My mom thinks you need to get it checked out, my Mom is a mammographer and she thinks it’s no joke”. Honestly, that is when my life changed, in an ironic twist of fate, a comment I made as a joke, saved my life.

Continue reading

It’s About You: Lynn Folkman’s Story

emailHeader760x1604_BlogResizeAt this year’s annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, we’re not just providing you with the unique information you seek; we’re offering you the chance to connect with others and learn that you’re not alone.  While being treated for breast cancer, Lynn Folkman went to her first-ever LBBC fall conference in 2009. She blogs about that day and the importance of creating the conference experience you want. Lucky for us, Lynn joined the team at Living Beyond Breast Cancer in 2012 as our Community Engagement Manager.

Lynn Folkman LBBC Fall ConferenceIt was fall 2009 – I had just completed chemotherapy, radiation therapy and was a few months into my year of taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) and I was exhausted. I found out about the LBBC Annual Fall Conference through one of my support groups and the thought of attending alone was too overwhelming for me, so I agreed to attend with a friend I met during treatment.

The conference that year was held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. I was a bit nervous about attending, as I had previously worked at the Convention Center and still knew quite a few people there, and they did not know that I had breast cancer. As well, the tables were turned; I was a meeting planner and instead of producing the event, I was experiencing the conference as an attendee.

I was in an emotionally raw and vulnerable state. I was at the point in my treatment where I often wondered if or when I would ever feel like myself again. I was tired of hearing the comment, “You look really great!” I longed for a day where I could be invisible and no one would know that I had breast cancer. However, I was still mostly bald and there was no masking what I was currently experiencing. I was apprehensive about having to endure glances from people who knew me, which would be mixed with a combination of sympathy and trepidation.  They were used to the vivacious energetic Lynn, not the exhausted Lynn.  How could I possibly fake it when I did not even have the energy to do so?

A few things occurred that day which continue to deeply comfort my mind and spirit and reinforce the special place in my heart for the LBBC Fall Conference. Since it was my first time attending, I had no idea what to expect. The day began with the opening session, the speaker welcomed the group and then asked people how far out they were from the time of their diagnosis. When your year was called, you were instructed to raise your hand. One year and under, my hand went up. I don’t remember the exact breakdown, but it went something like this: 1-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-15 years, more than 15 years and so on.  What I do remember is being overwhelmed as I heard cheers and looked around the room and saw so many raised hands and proudly smiling faces.   Continue reading

It’s About You: Laura Ross’ Story

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LBBC would like to introduce our newest guest blogger Laura Ross. Today she shares her breast cancer journey and how she became familiar with LBBC’s programs and services, specifically our annual Fall conference.

Driving on I-95 South in Philadelphia, late October 2011, I passed a billboard for Breast Cancer awareness month. “Ah” I said, “I never want to be part of that club!” One month later I would be handed my membership, and would begin a journey that changed my life.

November 18, at age 41, while snuggling my 3-year-old daughter Aliya, her head hit a hard pea sized spot in my upper right breast. Calling my other daughters, Gianna and Isabella, into the room, I asked them if they could feel it too, and indeed, they said they could. I didn’t really think too much of it. I had never even had a mammogram. I called my gynecologist and made an appointment. She too, could feel it, and scheduled the mammogram for early December.

After the testing was over, the doctor who performed the biopsy looked at me and said, “This is definitely breast cancer, when you get the results on Monday expect it to be cancer.” Uh. OK. I was completely shocked. I was completely alone. Continue reading

Li-Fra-What?

IMG_2502LBBC guest blogger Kate Crawford’s family was no stranger to cancer of all types, but after she was diagnosed at the age of 28 with HER2 + metastatic breast cancer the family started to wonder if genetics were to blame and urged her to undergo genetic testing. Today she shares her story on making the decision to have genetic testing and how that affected her and her family, including her young children. 

I was 28. I had no family history of breast cancer, but had a family history of cancer in general. My mother was diagnosed with thyroid cancer at 27, my grandmother died as a result of an incurable brain tumor and my grandfather had pancreatic cancer. One thing everyone pondered when I was diagnosed was: why? Why would an overall healthy young woman present with metastatic breast cancer? It is an extremely personal decision to have genetic testing. More than half of gene mutations are hereditary which means a diagnosis of an abnormality may mean your mother, sister, niece, cousin or your child could also be at risk.
I was worried about my children and decided to meet with the oncology genetic counselor in early 2013. It was one of the most informative meetings I had concerning my diagnosis. She explained to me how genetics play a role in cancer. Genes are fragments inside of cells, which are in chromosomes, and made of DNA. DNA contains the instructions for building proteins, which controls the how the cells make up your body. If there is a mistake in one of your genes, those cells will not grow and function properly which can lead to genetic abnormalities, like being more prone to develop certain cancers. She suggested that I be tested for the popular BRCA 1 & 2 gene mutations. A simple blood test and a little bit of waiting revealed that I was negative for a BRCA abnormality. “I would like to have you tested for one more thing.” she quietly stated, “Li-Fraumeni Syndrome”. “Li-Fra-what?” I asked. Continue reading

It’s About You: Lu Ann Cahn’s Story

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  Cahn_photo2014We would like to introduce you to our blogging series, “It’s About You.” In addition to telling you their personal story, our bloggers in this series talk about their experience with past LBBC programs and/or their anticipation for the upcoming fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences. Today, NBC10 reporter Lu Ann Cahn kicks off the series by sharing her breast cancer journey and the importance of connecting with individuals who share your experiences.

I was talking to a woman who just got through her second year of survivorship. We’d made a lunch date to talk about work, business opportunities.

I’d almost forgotten she’d had breast cancer until she mentioned she was dealing with horrendous hot flashes.

“The tamoxifen is making me crazy” she said.

“How are you feeling otherwise?” I asked

” Oh fine. I just want to forget about IT and move on.”

The IT she didn’t want to dwell on was Breast Cancer…and yet we spent the last twenty minutes we had together during our meeting, sharing our experiences, listening to each other.

I wished we’d started talking about it sooner. As much as she wanted to “forget”, I could tell it was a relief for her to talk to someone who has been there; someone who you don’t have to explain too much to, so much is already understood.

Her emotions were close to the surface; which is probably why she said she wanted to “forget about it”. Tears welled up in her eyes as she talked about how terrifying it’s been, the diagnosis, newly remarried, with a teen son.

I know . I remember.

It has been 23 years since I was diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer. My daughter was four years old. The year before breast cancer, I was hospitalized for 5 months. I had to have my colon removed because of severe ulcerative colitis. I was just recovering and feeling better when I started to feel a vague mass in my right breast. Continue reading