Beyond C4YW: LBBC’s Continuing Commitment to Young Women

LBBCbannerJean A. Sachs, MSS, MLSP, wrote the letter below to reflect on the end of C4YW and to remind you all that LBBC remains committed to serving young women affected by breast cancer. For more information about our upcoming events and programs, visit our website, lbbc.org.

Dear Friends,

This year marks the end of C4YW, an event that was founded in 2001 by Living Beyond Breast Cancer (LBBC) to address the needs of women diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 45. The following year, we invited the Young Survival Coalition (YSC) to co-host the event with us.

Over the past 13 years the conference became the largest of its kind. LBBC and YSC worked as equal partners in developing the conference, marketing it and raising the funds necessary to meet the need. First and foremost in our partnership was our goal to provide the best information, support and networking possible for young women affected by breast cancer. We achieved that and so much more. More than 10,000 participants benefited from C4YW, and we allocated over $1 million in travel grants to bring women and caregivers to this unique, and many times transformational, weekend.

On behalf of LBBC, I thank you for your participation in the conference.

Last November, YSC informed us with the bittersweet news that they would be ending the partnership following the February 2014 conference. I want to assure you that while the C4YW brand will be “retired”, it in no way impacts the commitment LBBC has to serving young women.

LBBC has been serving young women since 1996, and our strong commitment to providing robust services for them and their caregivers remains steadfast. Currently, LBBC’s Young Women’s Initiative includes:

I am so proud of the rich, timely and compassionate programs LBBC offers young women through our Young Women’s Initiative. In the coming months, I will be working with the board and staff to identify new ways to add to our programmatic offerings that serve this important LBBC constituency.

Onward,

Jean A. Sachs, MSS, MLSP
LBBC Chief Executive Officer
Toll-free Breast Cancer Helpline: (888) 753-LBBC (5222)
354 West Lancaster Ave., Suite 224
Haverford, PA 19041
(855)-807-6386

Blog Back: Reflecting on the Past, Looking to the Future

20140106AmyGrillo2 copyIn light of the holiday season, Amy Grillo, associate director of educational programs, wrote her “Blog Back” column on her work experience and Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s growth since she first joined us more than 10 years ago. She looks forward to the upcoming work that will help us fulfill our mission in 2014. 

Thirteen years ago I joined the staff of Living Beyond Breast Cancer. Its initial mission drew me in like a moth to a flame – empowering all women to live as long as possible with the best quality of life. That was inspiring to me. Inspiring in the “roll up your sleeves and get to work” making a difference sort of way! Since that time, LBBC has grown exponentially and has even developed a new mission statement. Our new mission, developed just this summer, is to connect people with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support. Another mission much worthy of hands-on action and inspiration! After all, and unfortunately, there’s still so much work to do. Continue reading

Introducing My+Story

Kevin Gianotto is the associate director of marketing, public relations and corporate partnerships at Living Beyond Breast Cancer.  He’s worked for nonprofit organizations since 2002.

Two weeks ago, I attended a reception at the Dover International Speedway where I had the chance to introduce a number of individuals I met to the work we do at LBBC to connect people to trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.  The conversations I had that evening inevitably led to the opportunity for me to discuss what I am most passionate about here at LBBC –women who have been diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, many of whom have become close friends, and the educational resources and support services LBBC has available for them.

52792_10151113120997285_1062790530_oMetastatic breast cancer—a form of advanced breast cancer also referred to as stage IV breast cancer—occurs when breast cancer has spread to other parts of the body.  Approximately 159,000 women in the United States are currently living with metastatic breast cancer, and this number is projected to increase to approximately 164,000 by the year 2015.

To raise awareness of Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day on October 13, LBBC has partnered with the MedImmune Specialty Care Division of AstraZeneca to promote the launch of My+Story, an online resource center which highlights the needs of women living with metastatic breast cancer and calls attention to metastatic disease as a key component of October’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day was officially recognized by the U.S. Congress in 2009, following a grassroots awareness effort led by members of the Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN).

The My+Story site houses tools and information tailored for women living with advanced disease. The website is designed to connect patients with the information they need, and links to patient support groups that have specific programs for metastatic breast cancer patients—like LBBC and MBCN.

Visitors can learn about metastatic breast cancer and treatment options, find tips on how to take care of their bodies, and celebrate their life experiences by creating a hard copy photobook of personal stories that may be shared with loved ones. Women with metastatic breast cancer and those who are directly inspired by them can also create a personalized flower badge that can be shared at MyMBCStory.com and with their personal social media community to help raise awareness. In addition, supporters of women with metastatic breast cancer can visit MyMBCStory.com/awareness to download free educational materials and inspire members of their community to help raise awareness of the disease.

Other great interactive features (ones my social media team here at LBBC love) allow visitors to share their favorite images and information from the site with others via Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. And, throughout the month, AstraZeneca will make a contribution to LBBC and MBCN each time visitors share content (up to a total of $28,000) in acknowledgment of the 28 years since National Breast Cancer Awareness Month was established and of the ongoing effort to bring metastatic breast cancer to the forefront. If you’re inclined, be sure to check out the site and let us know what you think.

Our New Vision and Mission

2012JeanSachsHeadshotVer2Web

This morning, Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s CEO Jean Sachs released the following message to our friends and supporters:

Dear Friends:

All of us at Living Beyond Breast Cancer are excited to share our new vision and mission statements with you:

Our new vision

A world where no one impacted by breast cancer feels uninformed or alone.

Our new mission

To connect people with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.

These new statements were developed with the help of over 1,200 of you who responded to a survey we sent out earlier this year. Your input was used in a day-long retreat with members of the board of directors and staff. We learned what LBBC services are valued most and why so many have come to depend on our educational programs and services that allow for connection to others diagnosed with breast cancer.

For me, these new statements say with clarity what we strive to do every day and what we hope to achieve over time. Yesterday, I spoke with a long-time friend who had just been diagnosed with breast cancer.  She was overwhelmed, scared and shocked. Our conversation and the resources I was able to put in her hands grounded her and provided her with enough comfort and confidence to take the next step.

This is what LBBC does every day, and it is exactly what the new vision and mission statements express.

I hope you share my enthusiasm and, as always, if you have comments I would love to hear from you.

Warmly,

Jean 

Jean A. Sachs, MSS, MLSP

Chief Executive Officer

LBBC

Lightened Up French Fries!

A few weeks ago, “Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen” authors Annette Ramke and Kendall Scott gave us some tips on how to use healthy foods to help boost our moods and ease anxiety and depression. Now these two regular LBBC blog contributors are back with a calorie saving and heart healthy version of a traditional comfort food: The French fry.

Sweet Potato Fries with Peanut Dipping Sauce

When looking to “upgrade” your food choices, it can sometimes feel overwhelming. It might be too much to make a huge, 360 degree change overnight. That’s why we love to keep it real and talk about doing it step-by-step. Every step counts and will make a difference! And guess what? Eating well can be delicious, too! Believe us, we are foodies and we want what’s on our plate to make us smile and make our taste buds happy!

One favorite comfort food many of us have is French fries. Here’s an idea, based on the “Poor, Better, Best Picks” concept in our book, Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen, for satisfying your craving while upping the nutrition in your food!

Continue reading

Give LBBC Your Feedback About Peggy Orenstein’s New York Times Article, “Our Feel-Good War on Cancer”

2012JeanSachsHeadshotVer2WebBy Jean A. Sachs, MSS, MLSP, Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s chief executive officer 

Journalist Peggy Orenstein ignited a debate when she explored the limits of mammography screening and the dangers of overtreatment for breast cancer in her New York Times Magazine article, “Our Feel-Good War on Cancer” (April 25, 2013).

For many in the breast cancer community, Ms. Orenstein’s observations come as no surprise. We know survival rates for women with metastatic disease have not changed, despite the widespread adoption of breast cancer screening. That women with ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, often receive the same treatments as those with invasive disease—along with the related side effects and emotional distress. That more and more women choose prophylactic mastectomy after a diagnosis of DCIS or early-stage disease. And that our sisters with stage IV breast cancer remain silenced, isolated and underserved.

Still, the article introduced thousands of people to the realities of breast cancer today. As we talked about it at the LBBC office, we had many questions. How did this piece impact you and your loved ones? We want to know:

  • What is your perspective?
  • What questions does this article prompt for you?
  • What are your concerns for your health or well-being, based on what you learned?
  • Which issues deserve more discussion?

Based on your feedback, Living Beyond Breast Cancer will design a program to help further discussion. Please post your comments below, and our staff will review them.

What, Me…Cancer??

On Tuesday we introduced first time contributor Sandi Dennis to the Living Beyond Breast Cancer Blog.  Sandi is a long time supporter of LBBC who grew up in Philly and attended Philadelphia High School for Girls (where she is looking forward to her 40th reunion in 2014!). She majored in journalism at Penn State and worked as a TV news reporter in Columbia, South Carolina, prior to attending University of South Carolina Law School. Today she practices FDA/healthcare law, and policy, including work for companies and nonprofits in oncology and patient advocacy.  She lives in Washington, DC, with her husband, daughter and a dog named Lulu. Here is part two of her story.

SandyDennis

On that day of the LBBC Yoga on the Steps Fundraiser in DC,  my sneaky triple negative breast cancer in fact was not gone, only as yet undetected.  And that 95% chance of non-recurrence? Well, somebody has to be in that 5%.  So much for my faith in statistics.   In early November 2012, a trip to the dentist and a routine x-ray showed something odd. “You don’t have a history of breast cancer, do you? I had a patient with breast cancer that metastasized to her jaw . .  .”  Well, my jaw dropped open, and then clenched through a roller coaster week of scans of my head, bones and brain (all normal), and a full body pet scan that showed metastases of my breast cancer to four sites—all soft tissue/lymph nodes.  In the world of Stage IV disease, I am very very early . .   . my cancer is virtually in its infancy. And I have every intention of keeping it there.  I am stunting your growth, you little b . .  .d!!

Wrong assumption # 5: stage IV is a death sentence.  I did not know that stage IV could be livable.  I truly thought that—except in rare instances—stage IV patients were down for the count.  I now understand that with current treatment I am likely to live for 20ish years (at which point I’ll be 75, which sounds way far away to me), and with treatment advances that are likely to emerge in the next decade, I’ll likely live longer than that–maybe even to my original target age of 90. (For some reason at age 45, I decided that 90 was a good ending point.)

I have just completed five rounds of chemotherapy, and am nearing the end of treatment.  The chemo was actually less fatiguing and I experienced fewer side effects this time.   I kept my hair, which shallow but true, makes me feel good about myself.  And I really, really don’t look sick at all, unless one notices my port.  I do suddenly have lymphedema in my right arm, a side effect of having fewer/less functional lymph nodes—even though those lymph nodes were removed surgically almost three years ago.  It’s always something.  But most importantly, the chemo is working! After three rounds, a scan showed that all four cancer sites had decreased in size by about 50%.  These numbers I can handle.  Hallelujah!  Thank you higher powers, and thank you drug developers, doctors, nurses, and everyone else that played a role in this.  Cancer, you’re going down.

Granted, I don’t always feel or act so tough.  Having a lifelong chronic disease is a life change that I haven’t quite wrapped my arms around yet. How exactly does one move on with life, and yet live from scan to scan? I feel like my cancer is a stalker that we may have driven away for awhile, but that is lingering nearby and can move back in at anytime.  My lifelong goal will be to keep him away from the good body parts.

In the meantime, I will continue to do the work I feel passionate about; work out, practice yoga, learn to meditate; be a loving mother, wife, sister, aunt, and friend; get pedicures, and buy rockin’ shoes.  Albeit, I will do all of these things as a cancer patient.  It’s not what I wanted or planned on, but it’s what I’ve got. And we don’t always get to choose.

You can continue to follow Sandi’s story by visiting her own blog, Cancer Diva 4 Ever and be sure to visit the LBBC blog for future posts by Sandi!

As we mentioned on Tuesday, LBBC will host its Annual Conference for Women Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer  Saturday, April 13 and Sunday, April 14 at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel.  The conference is designed to address the complex medical, social and emotional challenges that women diagnosed with metastatic disease, their families and their caregivers experience. To learn more about the conference visit lbbc.org.  In addition, on April 17, LBBC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation will conduct a free webinar at 12:00 p.m. EST.  Also accessible by phone, the webinar’s featured guest is Dr. George W. Sledge Jr. Chief, Division of Oncology, Professor of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.  During the call, you’ll hear about today’s standard of care in treating breast cancer that tests negative for the estrogen, progesterone and HER2 neu receptors and gain insight on making the treatment decisions that are right for you.  In addition, how to access clinical trials and get an insider’s look at the latest research on the horizon will also be discussed. Register online or call (610) 645-4567.