Hear My Voice: The Hope of Many Summers After a Metastatic Triple-Negative Diagnosis

Annie GoodmanNew York journalist Annie Goodman discusses the realities of a metastatic triple-negative breast cancer diagnosis, and living her life with more hope and less fear.

 

Maybe it’s all in my head. I can’t have brain tumors. Maybe I’m just depressed and need psychiatric help.

After discovering a lump, I was diagnosed with stage IIB triple-negative breast cancer on February 29, 2012. I was 30 years old with no family history of cancer. I had a mastectomy, reconstruction, four rounds of Adriamycin and Cytoxan and 12 rounds of Abraxane chemotherapy. While in treatment, I found out I had the BRCA1 mutation. On November 30, 2012, I finished radiation and my doctor declared I was in remission.

I went back to normal life. I enjoyed having a healthy appetite again. My hair grew back. I went back to work full-time. Having cancer was no longer all I could think about. It started to become a memory, and I loved life as a survivor.

Due to the BRCA1 mutation, I had to go for ultrasounds of my ovaries every six months. My first screening was perfect. In November 2013, I went for my second ultrasound, and as soon as I got into work, my doctor’s office called: I needed to come in immediately. My right ovary was 11 cm. A normal ovary is 3 cm.  Continue reading

From Silent to Vocal, Invisible to Visible, Underserved to Served

2012JeanSachsHeadshotVer2WebWhy LBBC Programs Focus on Metastatic Breast Cancer in October

By Jean Sachs, MSS, MLSP
CEO, LBBC

For nearly two decades I have dedicated my professional life to educating and supporting women, men and families whose lives have been impacted by breast cancer.  Over these years I have met so many incredible people who have faced this disease with courage and grace.  Every time I meet someone living with metastatic breast cancer, her story has a profound impact on me. LBBC is and has been committed to being there for these women and men.

In 2006, LBBC learned through its groundbreaking survey of women with metastatic breast cancer what I had heard so many times from my conversations with women living with the disease.  They often felt alone, poorly understood and served. The survey’s title, Silent Voices: Women with Advanced (Metastatic) Breast Cancer Share Their Needs and Preferences for Information, Support and Practical Resources, reflected this.

Before our study, women with MBC had never been asked about their needs as they faced the reality of a diagnosis that means they will always be in treatment. The survey also told us how isolated and alone women with MBC feel within the larger breast cancer community, especially during October when the focus of Breast Cancer Awareness Month skews heavily toward those newly diagnosed or whose treatment has ended—those who appear, at least on the surface, to be doing well.

LBBC took the information shared by our MBC survey respondents and began developing programs specifically for women with MBC to educate, connect and support them. Our Annual Conference for Women Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was founded in 2007, and specialized guides, webinars and peer support soon followed. We began to focus our October educational programs toward MBC.

Thirteen personal stories will be posted over 13 hours, written by women and men living with metastatic disease, their caregivers and healthcare professionals. The posts will appear on a special webpage on lbbc.org as well as on our organizational blog, livingbeyondbc.wordpress.com. Going forward, the LBBC Blog will feature at least one MBC focused post a month under the Hear My Voice banner.

It is my hope that this October the national conversation will start shifting to include more messages about MBC and many more voices discussing it year round. National organizations, including LBBC, have already formed the Metastatic Breast Cancer Alliance (MBCA), a group of patient advocacy organizations and industry partners seeking to improve the lives of and outcomes for those with metastatic breast cancer and their families. MBCA seeks to increase awareness and education about the disease, advance policy and strategic coordination of research funding. This group will release a landscape analysis of MBC research and services on October 13.  Together we have a louder voice and more strength to respond to the needs of those living with metastatic breast cancer.

All of this brings me back to my intertwined personal and professional commitment to LBBC- creating a world where no one impacted by breast cancer feels uninformed or alone. Our work continues.

It’s About You: Lynn Folkman’s Story

emailHeader760x1604_BlogResizeAt this year’s annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, we’re not just providing you with the unique information you seek; we’re offering you the chance to connect with others and learn that you’re not alone.  While being treated for breast cancer, Lynn Folkman went to her first-ever LBBC fall conference in 2009. She blogs about that day and the importance of creating the conference experience you want. Lucky for us, Lynn joined the team at Living Beyond Breast Cancer in 2012 as our Community Engagement Manager.

Lynn Folkman LBBC Fall ConferenceIt was fall 2009 – I had just completed chemotherapy, radiation therapy and was a few months into my year of taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) and I was exhausted. I found out about the LBBC Annual Fall Conference through one of my support groups and the thought of attending alone was too overwhelming for me, so I agreed to attend with a friend I met during treatment.

The conference that year was held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. I was a bit nervous about attending, as I had previously worked at the Convention Center and still knew quite a few people there, and they did not know that I had breast cancer. As well, the tables were turned; I was a meeting planner and instead of producing the event, I was experiencing the conference as an attendee.

I was in an emotionally raw and vulnerable state. I was at the point in my treatment where I often wondered if or when I would ever feel like myself again. I was tired of hearing the comment, “You look really great!” I longed for a day where I could be invisible and no one would know that I had breast cancer. However, I was still mostly bald and there was no masking what I was currently experiencing. I was apprehensive about having to endure glances from people who knew me, which would be mixed with a combination of sympathy and trepidation.  They were used to the vivacious energetic Lynn, not the exhausted Lynn.  How could I possibly fake it when I did not even have the energy to do so?

A few things occurred that day which continue to deeply comfort my mind and spirit and reinforce the special place in my heart for the LBBC Fall Conference. Since it was my first time attending, I had no idea what to expect. The day began with the opening session, the speaker welcomed the group and then asked people how far out they were from the time of their diagnosis. When your year was called, you were instructed to raise your hand. One year and under, my hand went up. I don’t remember the exact breakdown, but it went something like this: 1-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-15 years, more than 15 years and so on.  What I do remember is being overwhelmed as I heard cheers and looked around the room and saw so many raised hands and proudly smiling faces.   Continue reading

LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference is for You!

emailHeader760x1604_BlogResize

 

LBBC’s Annual Fall Conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, has a new look and feel. Catherine Ormerod, VP of Programs and Partnerships shares her highlights for the conference, taking place on Saturday, September 27, 2014 Philadelphia, PA.

Catherine-Ormerod 1Breast cancer research and treatments are constantly changing. It can be difficult to stay current with and understand the impact of these changes on you and your life. That’s why we have adapted this conference to connect you to trusted specific information. Consulting with some of the nation’s leading health specialists, this year’s conference will offer tracks to help you access the specific information that you’re seeking.

At the Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences conference you will get the unique medical information you seek for your specific type of breast cancer, while connecting you to others in a supportive environment. Our tracks are:

  • Triple-negative: presented in partnership with Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Hormone receptor-positive or HER2-positive
  • Metastatic

You can choose to follow a track or attend individual sessions based on your diagnosis or concerns. Our sessions will include information about the latest in breast cancer news, treatments and care and wellness. They will be presented by renowned breast cancer experts such as Virginia Borges, MD, MMSc; Clifford A. Hudis, MD; Rita Nanda, MD and Marisa C. Weiss. Topics will range from targeted therapies, metastatic breast cancer clinical trials, managing the side effects of chemotherapy and more, plus an engaging closing plenary, Thriving! A Discussion on Living Well – Body, Mind and Soul.

Attending a conference is a great way to not only get the latest information, but to connect with others and build a community of support. We often hear how long lasting friendships were created at LBBC conferences. I encourage you to take advantage of the many ways to share your experience – there will be breaks throughout the day, a special luncheon, closing reception and meetup groups organized by shared interests.

Registration for the conference is $50 per person but if you register before September 5th you will receive our early-bird discounted rate of $40 per person. We offer a limited number of travel grants and fee waivers on a first come, first served basis. Special thanks to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation’s for its support of travel grants to women diagnosed with triple-negative disease.

Visit lbbc.org/fallconference to register for the conference, apply for a fee waiver or travel grant and to learn more about our speakers and conference sessions.

I hope you can join us in Philadelphia this September!

Catherine Ormerod
VP, Programs and Partnerships, Living Beyond Breast Cancer
cormerod@lbbc.org
P.S. – Follow #LBBCconf on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for conference updates, staff picks on where to eat in our hometown of Philadelphia, what to see and much more!

Yoga: A Survivor’s Tool for Strength

KateGarza2 for 5 28Kate Garza is a mother of three teenagers, cancer survivor and yoga instructor in Cheltenham. Her “Team Kangaroo-om”  participated in our event, Yoga on the Steps: Philadelphia, on Sunday, May 18.  For more information or to register for a Yoga event near you, visit yogaonthesteps.org. Read Kate’s blog at LotsaHelpingHands.com.

I climbed the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum last Sunday for Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s Yoga On The Steps, a sun drenched block party of yoga enthusiasts and breast cancer affiliates. Occasionally my thoughts traveled back to last year’s event, which I attended during my own active treatment, bandanna wrapped around my chemo-bald head. On that gray day a year ago I felt as bad as the cold fog and drizzle that enshrouded the steps.

But last Sunday, bathed in sunshine, I shook off a year and a half of living with breast cancer treatment. I gathered with a large team from my kids’ high school, faculty and students together. I was there to give and gain support and to advance LBBC’s mission of bringing patients together with resources throughout the journey, one that can thankfully now include many years of health beyond treatment.

Cancer survivors have long had an intuitive sense that yoga helps body and mind, but now we have studies to prove it. In March, the Journal of Clinical Oncology published a study of 191 breast cancer patients by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. It linked yoga to improvements in self-reported quality of life, including measures of mood, pain and fatigue. Practicing yoga also appeared to help regulate the stress hormone cortisol, which is tied to poor survival among breast cancer patients.

Aware of these unique qualities of yoga, Living Beyond Breast Cancer has held Yoga on the Steps as its signature fundraising event since 2001, and in recent years has expanded to other cities — this July in Kansas City and September in Denver. Last year, LBBC, the Ardmore-based national education and support organization, published a Guide to Understanding Yoga and Breast Cancer, detailing the benefits of yoga to coping with anxiety, fatigue, strength and body image.

But what exactly is it about yoga that helps? Continue reading

Do You Have Any Idea How Beautiful You Are?

Musser_Barbara_2014Breast cancer can drum up many complex emotions and thoughts for those who are newly diagnosed, especially around body image. Barbara Musser, CEO and founder of Sexy After Cancer, writes about the importance of defining your own beauty and invites you to learn how to do this by joining us for our free webinar at noon ET/11 a.m. CT on Tuesday, May 20, held in partnership with Susan G. Komen of Greater Kansas City

Dealing with a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is a big challenge that goes on for quite a while. On top of that, it’s easy to feel like less of a woman, especially with altered or removed breasts, instant menopause resulting from chemo or hormonal therapies and other physical changes that can happen.  There’s not a lot of conversation about our body image, self-esteem and self-love and our intimate and sexual lives. And yet these are the subjects that have the most to do with the quality of our lives.

It’s the elephant in the room that no one mentions. Partly it’s because these aren’t easy topics to broach and partly because we don’t know to ask about them if we don’t know what to expect. You may have experienced this spiral. Continue reading

Blog Back: Healing and Embracing Change After Breast Cancer

LynnFolkmanLynn Folkman, manager of our volunteer programs, wrote her Blog Back post  about her personal growth after reaching her 5-year “cancerversary.”  Read her story and check out our past Blog Back columns.

“Feels like some kind of wild ride but it’s turning out just to be life going absolutely perfectly.”

Every morning, while having my espresso, I view a piece of artwork with the above statement and allow it to resonate in me.

In March 2009, I was diagnosed with stage I ER, PR and HER2-positive breast cancer. I have always been a believer that things happen for a reason. Although certainly at the time, I could think of no good reason why breast cancer and chemotherapy would be on that list. As 2014 began, I was rapidly approaching my 5-year mark and found myself filled with a variety of emotions: joy, sadness, anxiety and fear. Continue reading