Archive for the ‘breast cancer’ Category

Check Out Our Twitter Chat, #LBBCchat: Coping With the Financial Impact of Breast Cancer

June 25, 2014

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UPDATE, July 8, 2014: A transcript of our financial concerns Twitter chat is now available. Read the tweet conversation on lbbc.org.

If you read and related to our June 18th blog post discussing concerns about the financial impact of a breast cancer diagnosis, our Twitter chat,  Coping With the Financial Impact of Breast Cancer, is for you. Join us tonight, June 25, at 8 p.m. (ET) using the hashtag  #LBBCchat for an hour-long tweet chat with a panel of breast cancer, finance and legal experts to get answers to your questions and learn about

  • what insurance will cover, and how to navigate both hidden and visible costs of breast cancer treatment.
  • how breast cancer can impact your personal finances.
  • workplace accommodations and disability rights, and what you can do if you lose your job.
  • the resources available to help you ease the financial burden of medical bills.

Are you new to Twitter chats? Learn best practices for successfully participating in tweet chats.

Additional Resources

We offer many resources on financial concerns and breast cancer, including a guide, online content, our ask-the-expert series and podcasts and presentations of past programs.

Download or order print copies of our updated Guide to Understanding Financial Concerns.

Read our Financial Concerns content in the “Beyond the Basics” section of lbbc.org.

Learn about or apply for our Cis B. Golder Quality of Life Grant.

Check out the following from our Ask the Expert series:

Listen to and read these podcasts and presentations:

Discover additional information from these recommended resource listings:

I’ve Reached a Milestone…My Halfway Mark

June 20, 2014

Tiff Smiling Tiffany Mannino is back sharing another ‘Dear Lola’ journal entry with us; letters penned to her future daughter about her breast cancer experience. This time she shares her thoughts and feelings about being halfway through her chemotherapy treatment…

 

April 19, 2010

Dear Lola,

I know it has been quite a long time since I’ve written. Although I have thought about you every single day, the truth is, I have not wanted to share with you how I’ve been feeling. I always envisioned that what I would write to you would inspire and uplift you as I am a firm believer in finding the positive in every situation.  Truthfully, I’m having an incredibly difficult time finding the light in the midst of darkness at the moment as I’m going through such a challenging time in my life.

The last time I wrote to you was on the eve of my first chemo treatment. I was filled with great anxiety and anticipation. Well, now I should be celebrating because I’ve reached a milestone…my halfway mark. It has been eight weeks, and I have completed four of my eight treatments. Although I’m thrilled to be halfway done, I’ll admit, that doesn’t replace the dread I feel that I still have four more! I’m not going to sugarcoat it, chemo totally sucks!

Going through chemo for me has hands-down been the most difficult part of the breast cancer journey and truthfully, the hardest thing I thing I’ve ever faced. Each treatment has brought on a different set of challenges to face.

The first treatment made me violently ill to the point I was practically vomiting up my intestines. I remember lying in bed at 3 o’clock in the morning writhing and crying out to my mom, begging her to make it stop. In between tears, I pleaded with God to take away my pain. At that moment, my mother wrapped her entire body around me and with tears in her eyes, just held me like a baby. It is amazing to me as a 36 year old adult, how much I wanted and needed my mother as if I were a little child once again. In that moment, I realized that we never, ever outgrow our mothers and the need for their love and care. (more…)

The Financial Challenges of Breast Cancer: Resources and Tips to Help You Advocate for Yourself

June 18, 2014

emilykitchenAn unfortunate concern you may have if you hear the words, “you have breast cancer,” is paying for treatment. Emily Kitchen, manager of external affairs of the Patient Access Network (PAN) Foundation, wrote this post to provide you with helpful information to overcome the financial hurdles of this diagnosis. Get more information by tweeting with us and Ms. Kitchen on June 25 for our Twitter chat, #LBBCchat: Coping With the Financial Impact of Breast Cancer.  

You just found out you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer. You’re worried about your treatment, your family and friends. The last thing that you should be stressed about is how you will be able to afford your treatment. As one of our patients mentioned to me, the hardest part about cancer shouldn’t be how to afford it. However, with more and more underinsured people, this is becoming a harsh reality. Many will not even find out how much their treatment will cost until they arrive at the pharmacy to pick up their prescription. Those who can’t afford their treatments are often unable to continue therapy or medicine regularly or end up refraining from seeking care all together.

This is where organizations like the Patient Access Network (PAN) Foundation, Triage Cancer and local institutions like Community Legal Services (CLS) of Philadelphia can help. PAN offers help and hope to people with chronic or life-threatening illnesses by providing copayment assistance to those for whom cost limits access to breakthrough medical treatments. For instance, PAN can provide $7,500 a year to a patient with metastatic breast cancer.  (more…)

Major Plumbing Problems

June 5, 2014

randi rentzRegular LBBC guest blogger Randi Rentz is back! Today she’s tackling a topic we as a society consider rather taboo but while going through her treatment she found it became quite necessary to address the issue with her oncologist…

What ever happened to the old saying “in by 9, out by 5”? For me, after my cancer surgery and treatment it was “in at 9 out IN out IN out IN by 5” if I was lucky. There is nothing – absolutely nothing like being constipated after surgical procedures and treatment. Not only did I experience being “stopped-up” … as in non-functioning, total shut down, zippo, but one of the unpleasant side effects of my Taxotere treatment was colitis, an inflammatory process in the bowels resulting in diarrhea-diarrhea-diarrhea. Oy vey is mere. My plumbing problems were ever wretched. (more…)

The Cancer Mom

May 28, 2014

IMG_8155LLBBC’s newest guest blogger Kate Crawford is only 28 yet she has experienced many of life’s hardships, including a HER2+ metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. Today she shares her story about how her diagnosis helped her realize her health is just as much of a priority as the health of her family…

 

My quest of Motherhood was not so easily sought after. My first daughter passed away from a rare congenital mix of defects. The miscarriage to follow her death devastated me. I vowed not to try again until I became pregnant with my now 5 year old twin girls. My twins arrived 6 weeks early, both staying in the newborn intensive care unit for two weeks. I welcomed every cry, every fit, every middle-of-the-night feeding, every poopy blowout and every spit of vomit on my shirt. Motherhood was meant for me.

When my husband and I decided to try again, we were met with an even rarer pregnancy complication that threatened the life of my unborn son. The thought of loosing yet another child consumed my every thought. My uterus erupted in the middle of the night, 4 and a half years ago, and our son needed  life saving measures to survive his almost 8 week early arrival. He stayed in the hospital for over 2 months and at almost 3 had the articulation of a 12 month old and could barely walk but he was one thing: a fighter. (more…)

Yoga: A Survivor’s Tool for Strength

May 27, 2014

KateGarza2 for 5 28Kate Garza is a mother of three teenagers, cancer survivor and yoga instructor in Cheltenham. Her “Team Kangaroo-om”  participated in our event, Yoga on the Steps: Philadelphia, on Sunday, May 18.  For more information or to register for a Yoga event near you, visit yogaonthesteps.org. Read Kate’s blog at LotsaHelpingHands.com.

I climbed the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum last Sunday for Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s Yoga On The Steps, a sun drenched block party of yoga enthusiasts and breast cancer affiliates. Occasionally my thoughts traveled back to last year’s event, which I attended during my own active treatment, bandanna wrapped around my chemo-bald head. On that gray day a year ago I felt as bad as the cold fog and drizzle that enshrouded the steps.

But last Sunday, bathed in sunshine, I shook off a year and a half of living with breast cancer treatment. I gathered with a large team from my kids’ high school, faculty and students together. I was there to give and gain support and to advance LBBC’s mission of bringing patients together with resources throughout the journey, one that can thankfully now include many years of health beyond treatment.

Cancer survivors have long had an intuitive sense that yoga helps body and mind, but now we have studies to prove it. In March, the Journal of Clinical Oncology published a study of 191 breast cancer patients by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. It linked yoga to improvements in self-reported quality of life, including measures of mood, pain and fatigue. Practicing yoga also appeared to help regulate the stress hormone cortisol, which is tied to poor survival among breast cancer patients.

Aware of these unique qualities of yoga, Living Beyond Breast Cancer has held Yoga on the Steps as its signature fundraising event since 2001, and in recent years has expanded to other cities — this July in Kansas City and September in Denver. Last year, LBBC, the Ardmore-based national education and support organization, published a Guide to Understanding Yoga and Breast Cancer, detailing the benefits of yoga to coping with anxiety, fatigue, strength and body image.

But what exactly is it about yoga that helps? (more…)

Be Your Own Advocate: Don’t Be Afraid To Ask For A Second Opinion

May 25, 2014

Tonya Head ShotToday guest blogger, Tonya Priestley shares her story about following her intuition after being reassured nothing was wrong following an abnormal mammogram. She insisted on a second opinion which ultimately lead to her being diagnosed with ER/PR-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)…

On my 38th birthday, I gifted myself a mammogram. I had no signs or symptoms, no family history, and no doctor’s referral, but decided to move forward with a screening after seeing a close friend of mine struggle with very aggressive breast cancer. After the mammogram and a needle biopsy identified some calcifications, I was told that I didn’t need to worry because I did not have breast cancer, rather I just had some atypical cells.

The words ‘atypical cells’ didn’t settle well with me. I requested a copy of the results and called a nurse for an opinion. The nurse told me that I needed to see a surgeon.

The surgeon conducted a lumpectomy, which was a short surgery but a painful recovery process – physically and emotionally. I woke up cold and was given pain medication, a kind of narcotic, and immediately threw up. Then I received the news from the surgeon: the lumpectomy confirmed that I in fact did have breast cancer. I was diagnosed with ER/PR-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). (more…)

My Metastatic Breast Cancer Story

May 23, 2014

CarynPhotoLBBC guest blogger and regular volunteer, Caryn Kaplan was recently featured on CBS Talk Philly to discuss her journey with metastatic breast cancer, along with another LBBC friend and woman living with metastatic disease, Jewel. Here Caryn shares her experience doing the segment and why it was important to her to not only share her personal story but share about MyMBCstory.com which has helped her and continues to help her throughout her day to day life by providing information and tools about metastatic breast cancer…

Tuesday had finally arrived!!!  I had waited anxiously for this day….

It all started from an email from Kevin Gianotto, LBBC’s associate director of marketing corporate partnerships.  He had asked if I would be interested in being interviewed on CBS Talk Philly with Pat Ciarrocchi.  The topic was about living with metastatic breast cancer and also about MyMBCstory.com which is an online resource center developed by AstraZeneca with support and input from LBBC and Metastatic Breast Cancer Network (MBCN) which provides tools and information for women living with metastatic disease. I was really excited to discuss this site because it has really helped me through my journey and I was so excited about the opportunity, having been volunteering with LBBC for several years, for yet another chance to get my message out there: that there is life after a metastistic breast cancer diagnosis.  A life that is full and active, one to be lived and enjoyed.

I couldn’t wait!!! (more…)

Do You Have Any Idea How Beautiful You Are?

May 17, 2014

Musser_Barbara_2014Breast cancer can drum up many complex emotions and thoughts for those who are newly diagnosed, especially around body image. Barbara Musser, CEO and founder of Sexy After Cancer, writes about the importance of defining your own beauty and invites you to learn how to do this by joining us for our free webinar at noon ET/11 a.m. CT on Tuesday, May 20, held in partnership with Susan G. Komen of Greater Kansas City

Dealing with a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is a big challenge that goes on for quite a while. On top of that, it’s easy to feel like less of a woman, especially with altered or removed breasts, instant menopause resulting from chemo or hormonal therapies and other physical changes that can happen.  There’s not a lot of conversation about our body image, self-esteem and self-love and our intimate and sexual lives. And yet these are the subjects that have the most to do with the quality of our lives.

It’s the elephant in the room that no one mentions. Partly it’s because these aren’t easy topics to broach and partly because we don’t know to ask about them if we don’t know what to expect. You may have experienced this spiral. (more…)

Blog For Mental Health 2014: The Emotional Impact of Breast Cancer

May 14, 2014

mentalhealthblogdayToday is Mental Health Blog Day 2014, a Mental Health Month initiative from the American Psychological Association. As a contribution to this day, we wanted to acknowledge the emotional impact of breast cancer, in addition to sharing resources and letting you know that you are not alone.  

Whether you just heard the words “you have breast cancer,” are years beyond treatment or living with metastatic disease, it is likely that you experienced or continue to experience a range of complex emotions due to this major life change. At LBBC, we are dedicated to helping you cope with or manage these feelings by connecting you with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.

In recognition of Mental Health Month and Mental Health Blog Day 2014, we wanted to highlight programs, resources and inspiring personal stories by men and women affected by breast cancer.

First and foremost, we have a toll-free Breast Cancer Helpline (888-753-52220) answered live from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET. Staffed by volunteers who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, our Helpline will connect you with someone who cares and knows what you’re feeling. Call today or when you’re ready!

We also have some upcoming programs as well as podcasts and presentations of previous events, many of which you may find helpful: (more…)


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