Archive for the ‘Breast Cancer Helpline’ Category

It’s About You: Lynn Folkman’s Story

September 4, 2014

emailHeader760x1604_BlogResizeAt this year’s annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, we’re not just providing you with the unique information you seek; we’re offering you the chance to connect with others and learn that you’re not alone.  While being treated for breast cancer, Lynn Folkman went to her first-ever LBBC fall conference in 2009. She blogs about that day and the importance of creating the conference experience you want. Lucky for us, Lynn joined the team at Living Beyond Breast Cancer in 2012 as our Community Engagement Manager.

Lynn Folkman LBBC Fall ConferenceIt was fall 2009 – I had just completed chemotherapy, radiation therapy and was a few months into my year of taking trastuzumab (Herceptin) and I was exhausted. I found out about the LBBC Annual Fall Conference through one of my support groups and the thought of attending alone was too overwhelming for me, so I agreed to attend with a friend I met during treatment.

The conference that year was held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. I was a bit nervous about attending, as I had previously worked at the Convention Center and still knew quite a few people there, and they did not know that I had breast cancer. As well, the tables were turned; I was a meeting planner and instead of producing the event, I was experiencing the conference as an attendee.

I was in an emotionally raw and vulnerable state. I was at the point in my treatment where I often wondered if or when I would ever feel like myself again. I was tired of hearing the comment, “You look really great!” I longed for a day where I could be invisible and no one would know that I had breast cancer. However, I was still mostly bald and there was no masking what I was currently experiencing. I was apprehensive about having to endure glances from people who knew me, which would be mixed with a combination of sympathy and trepidation.  They were used to the vivacious energetic Lynn, not the exhausted Lynn.  How could I possibly fake it when I did not even have the energy to do so?

A few things occurred that day which continue to deeply comfort my mind and spirit and reinforce the special place in my heart for the LBBC Fall Conference. Since it was my first time attending, I had no idea what to expect. The day began with the opening session, the speaker welcomed the group and then asked people how far out they were from the time of their diagnosis. When your year was called, you were instructed to raise your hand. One year and under, my hand went up. I don’t remember the exact breakdown, but it went something like this: 1-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-15 years, more than 15 years and so on.  What I do remember is being overwhelmed as I heard cheers and looked around the room and saw so many raised hands and proudly smiling faces.   (more…)

Getting On Track – LBBC’s Reimagined Fall Conference

July 30, 2014

emailHeader760x160Our annual fall conference features three tracks because breast cancer is not just one disease. Clifford A. Hudis, MD, chief of the breast medicine service and attending physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, wrote this blog post about the reasons for these tracks and how breast cancer treatment became more individualized. A member of LBBC’s medical advisory board, Dr. Hudis will lead our morning plenary session on metastatic breast cancer. 

Hudis_lbbcblogpostGiven LBBC’s recognition that not all breast cancer is the same and not all patients need the same information, it is natural to see that the annual fall conference, Breast Cancer Today: Individual Treatments, Shared Experiences, is organized in tracks that enable participants to most efficiently focus on what they find to be most relevant. 

Not Just One Disease

Starting with oncology pioneer George Beatson’s 1896 report that some, but not all, women with advanced breast cancer responded to treatment that reduces estrogen in the body, it was clear that we confront more than one, uniform disease. The subsequent description of the estrogen receptor by cancer researcher Elwood Vernon Jensen in 1958 simply allowed us to test for what we already knew – that some cancers are more or less likely to respond to hormone therapies.

The more recent description of the human epidermal growth factor receptor–2 (HER2) and the development of effective treatments that target it added another dimension to “binning” breast cancers. With effective hormone and anti-HER2 therapies we can no longer pretend that cancer is cancer is cancer. One size does not fit all, and one disease is not the same as another.  (more…)

Blog Back: Healing and Embracing Change After Breast Cancer

March 31, 2014

LynnFolkmanLynn Folkman, manager of our volunteer programs, wrote her Blog Back post  about her personal growth after reaching her 5-year “cancerversary.”  Read her story and check out our past Blog Back columns.

“Feels like some kind of wild ride but it’s turning out just to be life going absolutely perfectly.”

Every morning, while having my espresso, I view a piece of artwork with the above statement and allow it to resonate in me.

In March 2009, I was diagnosed with stage I ER, PR and HER2-positive breast cancer. I have always been a believer that things happen for a reason. Although certainly at the time, I could think of no good reason why breast cancer and chemotherapy would be on that list. As 2014 began, I was rapidly approaching my 5-year mark and found myself filled with a variety of emotions: joy, sadness, anxiety and fear. (more…)


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